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August 27th 2014 - Written by: Kelsy

The Desert Dawg Trail

Our friend Ace Kvale is one of the world’s top adventure photographers. For over 30 years his action photos, striking portraits and stunning landscapes have captured the essence of wild places and diverse cultures in the far corners of the globe. Recently, Ace has used photography as an opportunity to raise consciousness. Through his latest work with vanishing cultures and international philanthropic organizations, he’s discovered new inspiration and purpose by using his skills to help people at risk. He specializes in cultural, documentary, travel and outdoor adventure photography.

 

Desert Dawg 1 Osprey Packs

The Desert Dawg Trail

 

In the first place you can’t see anything from a car; you’ve got to get out of the goddamned contraption and walk, better yet crawl, on hands and knees, over the sandstone and through the thornbush and cactus. When traces of blood begin to mark your trail you’ll begin to see something, maybe. Probably not.

–Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire

Desert Dawg 2 Osprey Packs

The first time I read those words I was living in a small cabin in the woods in the San Juan mountains of Colorado. I’ve never forgotten them. Ed Abbey left a huge impression on me. Since then I’ve been lucky to travel, ski, climb and photograph on six continents. From mountains in Tibet to rivers in Alaska I’ve been one lucky dude.

But the words of Ed Abbey have always held a grip on me. Hundreds of desert climbing trips have in no way extinguished my insatiable curiosity for the beauty of the canyon wilderness. That’s the thing right there. Wilderness. That’s the word. So simple.

Glamping. Wtf? Seriously? Yet it exists. The other day I saw a piece on the best iPhone apps for camping. No shit. But, to be totally honest I have an iPhone. I have the topo maps app with all the maps I need downloaded in it. I can press a few buttons and have my position pinpointed with incredible accuracy. It tells me right where I am on the map I’m holding in my sweaty hand. You are here. Awesome.

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July 9th 2014 - Written by: Joe Stock

Black Lake Chute–The Run of the Season

The Black Lake Chute took me ten years to ski. All that time it teased me from Anchorage. Above my home it looked like a thin white thread tied to the summit of O’Malley Peak. It hung down the north face and draped off of the lower wall. It became my White Whale. Sometimes, between attempts, I’d try to talk myself out of it. It’s too dangerous. There’s plenty of other stuff to ski. But I wanted it so bad….

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May 23rd 2014 - Written by: Sara Murphy

Mountainfilm in Telluride: #mfilm14 Primer

Mountainfilm in Telluride | Mountainfilm Logo | mfilm14 | Osprey Packs

photo: Gus Gusciora

photo: Gus Gusciora

 

Osprey Packs is a proud sponsor of Mountainfilm in Telluride — we’re honored to have supported this incredible event for 10 years!

Started in 1979, Mountainfilm in Telluride is one of America’s longest-running film festivals. Through the years, in and out of trends and fads, the Mountainfilm in Telluride Festival has always been best described by one unchanging word: inspiring. Far more than any other adjective, that’s how festival audiences describe their experience.

Mountainfilm is dedicated to educating, inspiring and motivating audiences about issues that matter, cultures worth exploring, environments worth preserving, adventures worth pursuing and conversations worth sustaining.

Festival Schedule 2014

Osprey Happenings at Mountainfilm

  • This year at Mountainfilm you can purchase a Mountainfilm/Osprey Pack on sale at the Mountainfilm store, proceeds benefit Mountainfilm.
  • Enter to an Osprey Packs Beta Port and a pair of ZEAL Optics glasses from Telluride Ski Resort, one of is the most beautiful resorts in the world, offering spectacular skiing & snowboarding, golf, lodging & year-round vacation packages. Simply tag your favorite Instagram photos from Mountainfilm with #mfilm14 and @tellurideski to enter!
The Official Festival Primer from Mountainfilm

Whether you’re new to Mountainfilm in Telluride this year or a veteran with decades of festival stories, listen up. The following tips and new additions might just make the difference between a good weekend and the best weekend…ever.

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June 15th 2012 - Written by: Kelsy

Friday Roundup: Finding Wildness This Weekend

Osprey's Shannon Hahn rappels 150 feet down a slot canyon in Zion National Park during a product testing trip in June 2012. Photo: Chris Horton

There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot. ― Aldo Leopold

Here’s to finding some wildness this weekend. Happy Friday from Osprey Packs!


February 9th 2012 - Written by: Kelsy

Leave No Trace designates Fourmile Area in Colorado first 2012 Hot Spot

For fifteen years we have been sewing labels listing the Principles of Leave No Trace into our larger packs. We look at it as a friendly reminder, from us to you, of your responsibility to the environment you enjoy with our packs on your back. Do your part by learning more about these principles and teaching them to others. Participate in the harmony of nature and leave no trace of your passage. We’re proud to support Leave No Trace and share news of the great work they are doing. The following is an update about 2012 Leave No Trace Hot Spots.

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September 22nd 2011 - Written by: Joe Stock

Cairns Round II: Do We Need Cairns (Or Want) in Alaska?

Thanks Osprey blog readers for your helpful comments on my Tear Down the Cairn post. I realize it was written with some arrogance, but sometimes it has to be done to get a reaction. Below is a second go at cairns — this time, I kept it to Alaska. Keep sending your opinionated, but civilized comments so I can keep working on this project. Cheers!

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June 29th 2011 - Written by: Kelsy

Remember to Leave No Trace When Backpacking this Season!

It’s summer and if you’re anything like us you’re probably itching to get out on the trail this weekend. With backpacking season in full swing, we thought it would be good to post a little refresher from the Leave No Trace Principles. Because it’s up to us to make sure our wilderness stays wild, healthy and fun!

  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
  3. Dispose of Waste Properly
  4. Leave What You Find
  5. Minimize Campfire Impacts
  6. Respect Wildlife
  7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors

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Learn more about Leave No Trace and the principles here. And remember, if you have an Osprey Pack, these principles are printed right inside your pack!



April 27th 2011 - Written by: Kelsy

2nd Week Winner in The Love Letter Photo Contest: Night Sky in Norway

-23 degrees C, 04:00 in the night at Finse, Norway. Sleeping alone outside with the stars, indescribable. — Håkon Broder Lund

Congratulations Håkon! Ready to post your own love letter? Here’s how you enter


April 26th 2011 - Written by: Kelsy

Take Action Today: Protect the Grand Canyon from Mining!

A new uranium mining boom is threatening further harm to the people, water, wildlands and biodiversity of the Grand Canyon region.

The Obama administration is considering a plan that would protect up to 1 million acres of the Grand Canyon’s watersheds from new uranium mining. But only one of the alternatives they’re considering — Alternative B — affords protections across the entire 1 million acre watershed.

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What can you do?

1. Knowledge is power. Watch the video and learn why we need to use our voice to speak up for the Grand Canyon right NOW.

2. Share the love! Post this video on your FB, Twitter or blogs. Tell your friends, neighbors, family what’s up.

3. Take action! Send a letter of support to the Obama administration urging them to stand firm and protect the Grand Canyon from nasty uranium mining.

May 4th is the last day the government will be accepting public comments, so please act today!


April 21st 2011 - Written by: Kelsy

The Love Letter: An Interview With Fitz Cahall

For 10 years, a dream lingered, but the clutter of modern living pressed it into submission. Still clinging to the pull of wild places and adventure, Fitz and Becca Cahall revived their youthful vision of summits and faint trails by abandoning work and the city for the wilderness. The Love Letter follows a pair of climbers in search of new and classic routes along the difficult to reach stretches of the Sierra spine, focusing not just on the summits themselves, but the process of attaining them. In the clutter of the modern world, can wilderness still restore the human spirit? We would like to think so.

We caught up with Fitz Cahall, one of the masterminds behind The Love Letter, and asked him some questions…

It sounds like The Love Letter was a dream in the making for a long time. What first sparked your inspiration for this project?

I was 22 living in a van that I didn’t own in Yosemite. We were scrambling to find a camp spot and this woman came up and said she had room in her campsite for another car. She was a scientist doing a project in the national parks. She was pretty old — 32. So ancient, I know. Oddly during that time, I’d keep running into her in the Sierra at various parks and campgrounds. She told me about this three week climbing trip she and her husband had done in Sierra and I thought that’s pretty cool. I thought about that trip a bunch then, but I never had the focus required to do a trip like that. I told Becca about it a while back and it was just always something that stayed in the front of my thoughts.

Later I found that Muir had done a similar trip. David Brower, the father of modern conservation, did an 8-week continuous climbing trip in 1934 and followed a similar course. He ticked off 54 peaks in that time. These men began their careers as climbers and writers and evolved into powerful voices. It’s not to say that I think I’m John Muir or David Brower, but they are certainly heroes of mine, and if I can some do a fraction of what they did for the American West, I will be content.

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