Osprey Packs

September 28th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

#MusicMondays Exclusive: Featuring Keller Williams and His New Album, “Vape”


At Osprey Packs, we value the experiences that being outdoors allows us to have — there is something truly transcendent about being outside, carrying only the belongings in your pack and being able to step back from the daily grind and the inherent distractions of the everyday hustle. Whether it’s a multi-day backpacking trip, international travel, treks to mountainous peaks, a weekend warrior camping trip, a dayhike or the simple enjoyment of the fresh air on a daily bike commute — the act of disconnecting (a.k.a. actually turning your phone all-the-way-off) and taking a break from daily responsibilities (a.k.a. “Grown-Upisms”) is important and far too often, fleeting. Being able to make time to really be in the present and not concern yourself with anything else but your immediate surroundings and well…yourself – it’s rare and beautiful. The outdoors are one such way to get back to what is sacred, that’s why we so fiercely advocate for their protection and conservation.

There are very few experiences in this world that allow for transcendent breaks the way that nature does but listening to music is definitely one of them. For years the Osprey family has bonded over our collective love of music. Our main connection to music stems, first and foremost from being fans but we’ve also been lucky enough to collaborate with talented artists who are themselves fans of Osprey – there’s definitely a mutual respect on both sides relating to our respective commitment to craftsmanship.

We’re proud to have teamed up with some of our favorite musicians to make their travels and adventures on the road easier by providing them with some of our best gear-hauling luggage and packs.

To show their appreciation, some of these musicians have reached out to see how they can provide a similar “ease” by sharing their tunes for our daily adventures. We can’t keep all the good vibes to ourselves and so we’re excited to be sharing #MusicMondays with all of our fans!KellerWilliams_OspreyPacks_MusicMondays_Interview

If you’ve ever seen Keller Williams perform, then there’s no need for you to read — you’re already familiar with the vibrant energy and exuberant personality that Keller Williams possesses. Keller is one of our favorite artists for those reasons and the undeniable fact that he is one of the most talented guitarists to hit the scene. Furthermore, with Keller you get exactly what you see — a riveting passion for playing music that results in kinetic energy shared by Keller and the audience. That level of authenticity rings true for us at Osprey and we love that Keller’s talent and personality have been responsible for bringing together some incredible musicians for projects like Grateful Grass, Grateful Gospel, Keller and the Keels and many other collaborations. His various Bands projects can lead to some of the greatest live performances of your life, and that same vibrant creative energy, sincerity and skill is ever-present in Keller’s new studio album “Vape”.

When he offered us an exclusive to stream “Vape” on the Osprey Packs website for 24 hours, we jumped at the opportunity to share the creative talent of Keller Williams with you all.

So here it is folks — an exclusive stream of “Vape” as well as an Osprey-original interview with Keller from our trip to Floydfest in Floyd, VA this summer.

Osprey Packs | An Interview with Keller Williams from Osprey Packs on Vimeo.

Last but not least, enter to win your own copy of “Vape” (signed by Keller himself) as well as an Osprey Packs FlapJack or FlapJill!

Enter win Keller Williams’ Album “Vape” + an Osprey pack!

Interested in what Keller carries on tour? 


Osprey Packs – Meridian Series: Deluxe wheeled luggage convertible, removable daypack.


Osprey Packs – Stratos/Sirrus Series: Men’s and Women’s Backpacking & Hiking – Ventilated backpanel, various liter sizes for a variety of activities.


Osprey Packs – Shuttle Series: Streamlined design, durable, large capacity gear hauling, foam padded sidewalls and compression.

September 26th 2015 - Written by: Osprey Packs

Nolan’s 14: Follow Ben Clark’s Epic 93 mi Traverse in Real Time

Ben Clark Nolans 14 Osprey Packs September 2015 Day 2

On Friday September 25th at approximately 6:00 am MST Osprey Athlete, mountaineer, filmmaker and ultra-runner Ben Clark kicked off his 6th attempt to complete Nolan’s 14. Nolan’s 14 is a challenging traverse that links 14 of Colorado’s 14,000-foot summits, one that covers nearly 100 miles of some of the Sawatch Range’s toughest terrain, one that must be completed in less than 60 hours.

Ben shared his thoughts on this attempt earlier this week and earlier this month.

Follow Ben’s Nolan’s 14 journey this weekend:
Delorme: share.delorme.com/BenjaminClark
Instagram: @bclarkmtn and @ospreypacks


Sunrise 14er Ben Clark Nolans 14 Osprey Packs September 2015

Osprey employee Scott Robertson pretty much sums up everyone at Osprey’s awe and appreciation for Ben’s efforts and accomplishments with the following reflection: (more…)

September 15th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

Short and Sweet…Wait, I Mean Steep: Climbing Mt Sneffels

Osprey Packs Marketing Director, Rob BonDurant

Photos by Osprey Packs Marketing Director, Rob BonDurant

On the weekend of August 22nd, I was joined by 5 other Osprey employees on a mission to climb Mt. Sneffels just outside of Telluride, CO. The plan was pretty basic and thrown together at the last minute, but the weather was shaping up to be great and we had an awesome crew that was both excited and eager for the adventure ahead.

Osprey Packs Rob BonDurant Sneffels Colorado Starry Sky

Geoff, Rosie, Scott, Rob, Vince, and I all left work Friday evening and piled into cars headed for Ouray, CO – a short 2 hour and 15 minute drive away. After a pit stop in Telluride for some food and cheap beer, we made our way around the Sneffels Range to Ouray. After trying and failing (multiple times) to get past a section of the “4wd Only” Yankee Boy Basin Road in my Subaru Outback we made camp by the creek about 2 miles away from the trailhead. With a clear night in front of us we made up our cowboy camps and got to rest under a blanket of stars.

I always enjoy the hustle and bustle of a campsite early in the morning before a big objective –6 people and 3 dogs all scurrying about getting their packs in order, eating breakfast, drinking coffee, and conversing with one another at the same time makes for a lively environment to start the day. Admittedly, time slipped away from us more than we’d liked it to that morning and we started up the Yankee Boy Basin Road just after 7:00am. We had seen a multitude of cars and trucks drive past our makeshift campsite earlier that morning so we knew it would be a busy day on the mountain.Osprey Packs Rob BonDurant Sneffels Colorado

The first 2 miles leading up to the trailhead were simple. We moved quickly up the slopes of the 4wd road, occasionally making way for a family of four in their Jeep Wrangler (or another type of engineering marvel that gobbles up rocky terrain as if this road should be its daily commute). The sun was shining and the views were stunning, for all of us in the group it was our first time in this basin and on this mountain – 4 of the 6 in our group have only moved to Southwest Colorado in the past year!


At the trail-head we began to see what was in front of us: just over a mile of terrain left to cover, but over 1,500’ of elevation gain in that distance. Pushing on with Scott and Geoff out front with the dogs we made great time ascending the loose, scree-covered col. At “the notch” below the summit we took turns in groups staying with the dogs, and groups heading up for the summit at 14,150’. Spending almost an hour near the summit resting and enjoying the views, we ran into our US Sales Director, Brad Bates, and his wife Vicky celebrating their wedding anniversary in style. After a few more minutes enjoying the thin air, we made a plan with Brad and Vicky to rendezvous at our campsite for beers and started our descent down the mountain. The steep, loose scree made for some interesting moments on the way down, but we all made it down in one piece. Well, almost all of us… Vicky fractured her wrist in 2 places after slipping on the descent. Like the true badass she is she came down to camp, drank some moonshine, and then went to get her injuries treated.

Being able to haphazardly throw a plan together and also have 5 of my coworkers added the mix is my favorite aspect of being an Osprey employee: Every person I was with shared my excitement for adventure and was willing to spend 24 straight hours with each other, despite the fact that we still don’t know each other very well. My coworkers are my friends, and my friends are pretty damn cool.

11218694_425842334285698_3743412576669805275_nWritten by Osprey’s very own Mychal McCormick, our International Sales Coordinator. Mychal has been with Osprey for 2 and a half years now. In his downtime, you can find Mychal perfecting the art of bocce ball as he pursues his semi-pro career under the pseudonym of Demetri Lemeux. On the weekends, Mychal enjoys quiet strolls up the numerous 13,000 foot mountainous peaks that surround our headquarters in Southwest Colorado. From time to time, he makes a quick escape to the residing desert in our neighboring state of Utah. Follow his adventures on Instagram.

August 17th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

Osprey Packs Returns to the USA Pro Cycle Challenge August 17th-23rd


image provided by colorado.com

“Known for lung-searing altitudes and steep climbs through the Colorado Rockies, the Pro Cycle Challenge is the largest spectator event in the history of the state.”

Osprey Packs will be returning to the Pro Cycle tour to take part in the action-packed week when the largest names in the world of road cycling will compete in some of the most breathtaking stretches of road in Colorado. Of course, the stages in previous years proved to be challenging but 2015 follows this trend with the tour starting in Steamboat Springs before traveling to new host communities Arapahoe Basin and Copper Mountain, as well as an individual time-trail course in Breckenridge.

What else is new for the 2015 Pro Cycle Challenge? This year marks the inaugural Women’s USA Pro Challenge bringing back international level women’s stage racing in Colorado for the first time since the Coors Classic in the 1980s!


The USA Pro Cycle Challenge is arguably the largest spectator cycling event in the nation and that’s not only because of the race itself. This event provides each host city with an excuse to not only celebrate the racers and sport of cycling, but to put on unique community events such as concerts, family activities, demos, trail running and biking competitions and while spreading the love to fans with a variety of freebies from participating vendors and tour sponsors.

If you plan on following the entire tour or just stopping by for one day, be sure to drop by our booth as we have some great activations and giveaways that you won’t want to miss:

  • Limited Edition FlapJack Pro Cycle Challenge Pack: Combine the best of both worlds – one of our newly designed Fall 2015 FlapJack Packs which is co- branded with the Pro Cycle logo,  a functional and memorable souvenir for years to come! In celebration of the Pro Cycle Challenge we doing a killer deal of $85 normally $110 MSRP) and only while supplies last so don’t delay!FlapJackPack_F15_Side_Black_ProChallenge
  • Osprey Packs Cowbell with all proceeds to IMBA: Earn some good karma points while cheering on the pros by picking up a customized Osprey Packs cowbell! All proceeds will benefit Osprey Packs non-profit partner, International Mountain Bicycling Association, which supports great rides nationwide by providing trail project grants and funding access issues.
  • Pack Fitting by the Experts: In the market for a new pack but still need to figure out some of the details? Not to worry, our Pro Cycle team are pack-fit gurus and can find the pack that fits your specific needs and style! Stop by to get professionally fitted or just to chat about the options we have.
  • 20% off at Mountain Outfitters in Breckenridge: We have teamed up with our local retailer, Mountain Outfitters to bring you 20% off all Osprey Packs in their store! If you are attending the Breckenridge stage of the challenge, stop by to take advantage of this great deal!

photo via www.colorado.com/Jeremy Swanson

If you weren’t able to make it out to Colorado this year, then check out the livestream of each stage or the Official Tour Tracker to keep up with the racers! Be sure to follow this year’s races on social media with the Official USA Pro Cycle Challenge social sites:





Follow Osprey Packs on social media to keep up with the race throughout the week:




July 29th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

Osprey Packs | Trail Series – Sedona, Az

Join Nate and Maria as they explore the varied trails of Sedona, AZ with their favorite Osprey hydration packs, the Raptor and Raven Series.


July 26th 2015 - Written by: Joe Stock

Mountaineering in the Arctic Refuge with Osprey Athlete Joe Stock

Osprey Packs Athlete Joe Stock is an internationally certified IFMGA mountain guide based in Anchorage, Alaska. He has been climbing and skiing around the world for 25 years with extensive time in the mountains of Alaska, the Southern Alps of New Zealand, the North Cascades of Washington and Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. Since 1995, Joe has been freelance writing for magazines starting with a feature article in Rock & Ice on climbing the Balfour Face on Mount Tasman in New Zealand. Since then, he’s published numerous articles on adventures and mountain technique in rags such as Climbing, Backcountry, Alaska, Climbing, Trail Runner, Men’s Health and Off Piste.


In 2009, Paul Muscat and I climbed Mount Chamberlin, then considered to be the highest summit in the Brooks Range at 9,020 feet. Now, Mount Isto might be the highest at 9,060 feet. It was just the excuse we needed for another trip to this pristine wilderness.

Joining us was Glenn Wilson and James Kesterson. Over the past 17 years we’ve been on many trips together: Denali, Mount Baker, Marcus Baker, Mount Bona, Mount Iliamna, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru, Mount Chamberlin, Mount Logan and the Central Talkeetna Mountains. On this trip we didn’t get up Isto, but we had a blast exploring and bagging peaks.

With logistics help from Alaska Alpine Adventures, we flew direct from Fairbanks to the Jago River with Wright Air. It was a two and half hour bush flight, with no in-flight service. This region is better known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, where Alaska’s embarrassing half-term governor once said, “Drill baby drill.”

The plane is a Helio Courier, made in the 1970’s and designed for a low stall speed. Supposedly it will fall horizontally rather than nose dive. The tires are Alaskan Bushwheels, made near Anchorage in Chugiak. They are the “premier tire for extreme backcountry adventures.”


Glenn and I got brand new Volt 75 packs for the trip. They were perfect! The right size for our eight days of food, fuel and mountaineering gear. They fit like a slipper, straight out of the wrapper. Once again, Osprey made our trip better.


mtn.anwr.stock-720Our first summit was the 8,625-foot Screepik. While conducting summit LNC (Leave No Cairn) we found Tom Choate’s name in a sodden film canister. In 1999 he climbed Screepik and made the impressive scramble over to Isto. His trip reports are in the October 1999, February 2000 and the November 2013 Scree newsletters from the Mountaineering Club of Alaska. Choate called Peak 8625 “Spectre”. First ascentionists called it Shadow Peak. Keeping with the tradition, we called it Screepik. Scree for the endless boulderfields, and “pik” for the Inuit word for “genuine.”



Descending from the summit of Screepik. Nobody out there. Just us.



After eight days of mountaineering at high camp, we returned to a base camp by the landing strip on the Jago River. Here’s Paul on one of our day-hikes from camp. Our tent is a tundra-colored dot in the tundra fields way down there along the river.


mtn.anwr.stock-790Another day hike along the Jago, this time up the big split in the river. While the first part of our trip was cold, drizzly and snowy, the second part was warm, calm and sunny. The bugs weren’t even out yet. Conditions were ideal for snoozing in the soft tundra.



James, Paul and Glenn mid-layover at the Arctic Village Airport terminal on the flight home. Thanks for another great trip guys! And all the memories. I can’t wait until the next installment. Maybe to try Isto again. Maybe to try the next highest Brooks Range summit. There is a rumor that it’s now some unnamed peak. Oh bummer. I guess we have to go back…. 

July 7th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

Adventure-Journal.com – Featuring Escapist 32


Hydration packs have come a long way since 1988, the year that a young EMT named Michael Eidson invented the CamelBak by stuffing a pilfered IV bag into a tube sock and safety-pinning it to his back during a century ride. But while hydration packs are ubiquitous today, anyone who has ever attempted a a multi-day mountain bike trip can attest to their main shortcoming: most of them are too damn small. You can’t, however, say that about Osprey’s Escapist 32, which boasts a load range of 15 to 30 pounds.

The Escapist 32 is designed with mountain bikers in mind and if bikepacking isn’t your thing, it also makes for a great day hiking pack…

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March 15th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

Riding Cancer into the Ground

Riding to work - phto by U of C photographer

I woke up at the usual time, 5:30 AM, on the morning of my last radiation treatment for prostate cancer.

It had been a long haul; from diagnosis of the most aggressive form of what is more typically a slow-growing cancer in October 2011, to surgery in November. Then started the 38 radiation treatments: five days a week for two months during the summer of 2012. I had asked my radiation oncologist, Dr. Stanley Liauw at the University Of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center, if I would able to ride my bike to every treatment. It was a 44-mile round-trip from my home in Evanston, a northern suburb along Lake Michigan, to the Cancer Center in the Hyde Park neighborhood on Chicago’s South side.

“Well,” Stan said, “we’ll see how you feel about halfway through.” (more…)

December 3rd 2014 - Written by: alison

Holy Terror Farm: Fall Harvest with Alison Gannett

I love and I hate farming. It all started with a quest to grow and raise all our own food five years ago. I even remember the last month I needed to actually go to the grocery store – April 2010.


Certainly there are a few key exceptions – coffee for my hubby Jason, chocolate for me, spices that we can’t grow, and life-maintaining Real Salt from Utah – for ourselves and the animals.


But back to the love and hate thing – I adore having this connection to our land, this feeling that we are doing something immensely important, and this incredible sense of self-reliance. Everyday I learn something new that my grandmother must have done her whole life.


She never had to figure out make all this garden/orchard/pasture bounty to last for months – to render lard/tallow, make butter, dry herbs and veggies, can tomatoes, ferment peppers/cucumbers, cure squash/pumpkins/nuts/shallots/onions/animal forages (corn, sunflowers, barley, wheat)….the list is endless.


The days are long, tedious, exhausting – feed, water, harvest, cook, feed, water, irrigate, harvest again, dry, preserve, freeze, jar, vacuum seal. When tasked with putting up all our food for the long winter, quitting is not an option. Skipping out for a bike ride and leaving the tomatoes to freeze and burst or the walnuts to be stolen by the squirrels he “inbox” is never empty.


But in the end, with the root cellar and freezers full of our 10 months of hard labor, we are pleasantly content to enter the long winter. Now finishing our fifth year, it has gotten a bit easier as we have figured out our ancestor’s systems. And while I wish we could take irresponsible vacations together more often, the “prepper” in me feels ready just in case.


In reality, I will most likely just have the world record amount of our farm food in all of my Osprey Packs (Transporters, Ozones, Snowplay) as I travel to my many KEEN Rippin Chix Steep Skiing/Adventure/Powder Camps this winter – Silverton, Crystal, Whitewater, Red Mtn and to anywhere the snow is DUMPING! Join me?

Think Snow!

November 25th 2014 - Written by: Joe Stock

Chugach Rock Climbing

Osprey Packs Athlete Joe Stock is an internationally certified IFMGA mountain guide based in Anchorage, Alaska. He has been climbing and skiing around the world for 25 years with extensive time in the mountains of Alaska, the Southern Alps of New Zealand, the North Cascades of Washington and Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. Since 1995, Joe has been freelance writing for magazines starting with a feature article in Rock & Ice on climbing the Balfour Face on Mount Tasman in New Zealand. Since then, he’s published numerous articles on adventures and mountain technique in rags such as Climbing, Backcountry, Alaska, Climbing, Trail Runner, Men’s Health and Off Piste.


The Chugach is not famous for rock climbing. Probably the most fame it received was in a Rock & Ice article containing the Seward Highway among the five worst climbing areas in the United States. But the Chugach does have some solid rock. And if you don’t compare it to Colorado rock or California rock then you’ll have a great time.

The foothills of the Chugach Mountains above Anchorage have some of this solid rock. The problem is finding someone to adventure up there. I recruited my buddy Joshua Foreman to go exploring on O’Malley Peak. After hiking almost two hours we reached the base of a 500-foot buttress. As we climbed we found evidence from other parties, going back forty years: pitons, bongs, nuts, rotting slings. These  climbers had intense personal experiences on this cliffs. They told stories to a few buddies at the bar. The adventure became a faint memory in their lifetime of adventures. Without social media, the adventure was able to refresh itself for the next party.


Joshua following the first of four long pitches on the Deep Lake Buttress. He’s using the new Mutant 38–light and sleek! The solid Chugach rock has a weathered brown veneer.


Joshua leading pitch two. He pulled this second roof onto 60 feet of wet and runnout slabs. For an hour the rope inched up the rock as grunts and explicative floated down. Joshua also enjoys high-speed downhill biking and has competed as a speed skier in Alaska’s notorious Arctic Man. Leading a runout wet slab as his first rock climb in six months was perfect.


Joshua and I with the Deep Lake Buttress behind. Rock climbing in Alaska in mid-May. We are so lucky.


Whether your pack was purchased in 1974 or yesterday, Osprey will repair any damage or defect for any reason free of charge.