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Posts Tagged ‘Mozambique’

Ready, Set, Go: The Lost Mountain Takes Off

May 8th, 2014

As an author, professional climber, filmmaker, and entrepreneur, Osprey Athlete Majka Burhardt has spent two decades exploring the globe—usually by hand and foot—and her stories of challenge, humanity, and the fine line between extreme and acceptable risk continue to inspire audiences around the world.

The Lost Mountain is a project about discovery, adventure, and ultimately survival in one of the world’s least-explored and most-threatened habitats. Mt. Namuli, a 7,936-foot granite monolith, is the largest of a group of isolated peaks that tower over the ancient valleys of northern Mozambique. Here, plants and animals have evolved as if on dispersed oceanic islands, so that individual mountains have become refuge to their own unique species of life, many of which have yet to be discovered or described by science. Yet despite these distinctions, it is Mt. Namuli’s linkages to the surrounding landscape and its position along a corridor of mountains stretching from South Africa to the Arabian Peninsula that has gripped the attention of the world. The Lost Mountain is about working locally to create locally-generated change and possibility.  It is also about sharing that story with the world.

Majka shared this update from May 1, 2014:

Osprey Athlete Majka Burhardt | The Lost Mountain

Prep time in Mozambique, Photo by Erik Eisele

Four days from today, I meet my international team of scientists, conservation workers, climbers, filmmakers, students, and volunteers at the airport in Blantyre, Malawi. We’re heading to Mozambique; we’re heading to the Lost Mountain. All totaled, 19 people varying in age from 19 to 55, from Brazilians to South Africans, Americans to Mozambicans, with backgrounds ranging from snakes to photography, forestry to rock climbing, will be working together for one month in the African bush. We have big goals. It started small. It’s mostly my fault—and I’m the one who’s in charge. Read more…

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This is Not Mozambique: The Lost Mountain Postponed Until Spring

November 6th, 2013

This is not Mozambique… (Climbing with Ray Rice at Shell Pond Maine on the day I was supposed to be landing in Malawi.)

It’s November 6th. I should be traveling overland from Malawi to Mozambique. I should be squished in a long base truck with my team alongside duffels of climbing gear, insect specimen nets and enough food for fourteen people for twenty-one days. I should have my face pressed against the window with my eyes open wide saying Oooh! See that? and pointing out beautiful granite dome after beautiful granite dome to my climbing partner Kate while she does the same from the other side of the truck.

But we are not en route from Malawi to Mozambique today. We aren’t because at 7 AM on Sunday, October 27th, we awoke to news of another incidence of violence in central Mozambique. The day before, a civilian convoy of three vehicles was attacked and one person was killed. It was horrible news for families of the person killed and those injured, for the people in the Sofala region and for the country of Mozambique. Tensions had been escalating in Mozambique in the week leading up to our scheduled departure and we’d been monitoring the situation extremely closely. Following the news on Sunday morning, and in light of the rising unrest and expectations of continued escalation heading into the upcoming elections on November 20th, we made the very difficult decision to postpone the project until May/June 2014. Our cinematographer Q was at the airport check-in counter when we made the call. All of the other U.S.-based members of our team were within 4-6 hours of take off.

James Q Martin, Lost Mountain Cinematographer, Ready to go… back home for now.

Coordinating a 14-person international team is never easy. But deciding that the safety of that team comes first is very easy. In the week since our decision, tensions have continued to rise with new incidents daily, including several in the towns that our Conservation Team LUPA would be traveling through en route to join us from Maputo. We — and the majority or Mozambique and the world — hope that the people of Mozambique keep the peace they have worked so hard to maintain. Most expectations point to a resolution in the time following the upcoming elections. We have chosen to postpone until May/June as that will be at the end of the rainy season and during a time when our science team can do its best work — i.e. find the maximum number of bugs and other creepy crawly things. We will continue to monitor the situation in the meantime and are in daily contact with partners and advisors in Mozambique.

It’s now been just over a week since we didn’t start our trip. It’s been just long enough to go from the shock of the decision to the excitement about what we can create with a touch more time to plan: additional scientific specialties, new collaborations and more connections and possibilities discovered every day. It’s also been just enough time to have unpacked my bags, and repacked them. 75% of what was in them is unique to the Lost Mountain. They are ready and waiting in my basement for spring.

Keep up with #LostMountain at http://www.thelostmountainfilm.com/

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adventure, Advocacy, causes, Conservation, Osprey Athletes, Osprey Culture, Osprey Life , , , , , ,

The Lost Mountain: Notes from The Mozambican Bush

November 29th, 2011

Osprey athlete Majka Burhardt is making her way with a team of climbers, biologists and filmmakers this week to Mt. Namuli, a remote granite peak in northern Mozambique. Their mission: to explore the cracks and recesses of Mt. Namuli’s 700-meter cliff face, searching for new species of life.

Here’s the latest post from Majka and her climbing partner on the trip, Sarah Garlick…

Day 1

MB: I say goodbye to Ethiopia (intentionally), and to my new ultralight Thermarest (unintentionally). My first-ever spotting of the Congo appears initially out of a plane window, and soon through a propped-open plane door during a re-supply. Malawi and Mozambique bound.

SG: It’s 5:30 a.m. at Boston’s Logan Airport. I have a bad reaction to my anti-malaria meds and vomit into a trashcan at the airline check-in desk. I can feel the stares of the hundred or so early morning passengers in line behind me. Please let this not be a sign for what’s to come.

Day 4

MB: We hike the wide side of a long arcing bend in the trail to see Mt. Namuli on its other side. I requisition a flask of whiskey from an already drunk porter. Herpetologist Werner Conradie confirms the presence of crocodiles in the Malema River while we are hip deep, midstream.

SG: It’s dark. We’ve been hiking for 6 hours already and there’s nowhere to stop until we get to the Queen’s hut at the base of the mountain. Our guide Cotxane (pronounced co-chan-ee) says it’s only 30 more minutes, but I don’t believe him. We are a group of thirteen—climbers, scientists, guides, and porters—hiking single-file through the bush, illuminated by the narrow light of four headlamps. I can’t help but think about lions and spitting cobras, the former apparently hunted out from this area, the latter we’ve already seen, but with any luck not active at night?

Read the rest of the story from Majka and Sarah over on The Lost Mountain blog

Majka Burhardt is a writer, climber, and AMGA-Certified Rock Guide who lives in Boulder, Colorado… when she’s home. Lately she’s been spending a lot of time searching for stone in Africa. Stay posted on her adventures in Mozambique over on The Lost Mountain site.

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adventure, Osprey Athletes, travel , , ,

Majka Burhardt: Setting Off For The Lost Mountain in Mozambique

November 7th, 2011

Osprey athlete Majka Burhardt is making her way with a team of climbers, biologists and filmmakers this week to Mt. Namuli, a remote granite peak in northern Mozambique. Their mission: to explore the cracks and recesses of Mt. Namuli’s 700-meter cliff face, searching for new species of life.

via Majka on The Lost Mountain blog:

Over two years ago I came across photos of granite faces in Mozambique. I had no idea that those photos would lead me to today, November 6th 2011, packing for one of them in room 108 in the Jupiter Hotel in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. It is fitting that Ethiopia—the place that has given me so much unexpected adventure and even more of life from adventure—is my staging ground for this next journey.

I’m lucky on this trip to be joined by Sarah Garlick and Paul Yoo. Sarah and I have been climbing partners and friends for years but this will be our first big trip together. Paul is a filmmaker base in LA and this is the first project for the three of us as a team. We really have no idea what we’re in for. None of us would want it differently. We have the basics—an unclimbed granite face, a landscape in Mozambique that is a hotbed of biodiversity, a group of local stakeholders who care about that landscape and need it to live off of to survive and flourish.  And we have the intent to find all that we can in ourselves and in the journey.

Read more

Majka Burhardt is a writer, climber, and AMGA-Certified Rock Guide who lives in Boulder, Colorado… when she’s home. Lately she’s been spending a lot of time searching for stone in Africa. Stay posted on her adventures in Mozambique over on The Lost Mountain site.

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adventure, Conservation, Osprey Athletes, travel , , , ,

If Mozambique Can Do It…

November 3rd, 2010

If you’ve ever perused the world of bike blogs, you’ll know that there are plenty out there. Popularized by the “izes” like Copenhagenize and Amsterdamize, many of these blogs try to capture the essence of a city’s bike culture.

But it’s not only the commonly known bike hubs – Copenhagen, Portland, New York, etc. – that are publicizing their two wheeled efforts. Bikes are popular all around the globe, which was highlighted this week when we discovered the Mozambique Bike Culture.

Not only are there some pretty great photos of biking in the streets of Mozambique, but they do a bit of advocacy, promoting Critical Mass in the country’s capital of Maputo. Hop on over and check it out, the more international support for cycling the better!

Any other cool bike blogs we should be checking out? Let us know in the comments below!

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Bikes Around the World, Ditch Your Car

Finding My Element – Mozambique (Part 2)

October 11th, 2010

View from the Dive Center balcony. Beautiful waves... but hard for boat launches and diving!

Turns out I was fine. This decision was made at about 9:00am.

Several hours earlier, however, as I leaned over the balcony in a lineup of seven brow-furrowed, defiantly complacent divers staring out to the choppy, gray Indian Ocean, that fact didn’t seem so certain.

Moments earlier, I had abruptly awoke, ripped my board shorts and bathing suit out of my ReSource bag, and scurried barefoot to the Dive Center like a little kid late for the first day of school.

Left, right, left, (wobble) right… My body felt the lack of the previous nights’ sleep as it creaked in to motion, and my feet pounding the sand became cadence for the morning’s mantra: Oh. Please. Oh. Please. Oh. Please.

If I’d known what ocean conditions to “will” into being, I would have. But, having dove just four times in a lake with no current, no visibility and no surf, I didn’t really know what to ask the Ocean Gods for. Just a chance to dive.

Read more…

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Conservation, Osprey Adventure Envoys , , , , , ,

Finding My Element – Mozambique (Part 1)

September 24th, 2010

Ponta Malongane, Mozambique

“You’re nervous about diving,” he said. Caine’s voice cut through the still, humid darkness of the tent in a matter-of-fact, but gentle way.

A surrendering exhale escaped my lungs before I could catch it. I could feel my cheeks blushing.

“Yup,” was the profound response that left my mouth, a single word that didn’t even begin to touch all the questions running around in my head… How can you be that inside my head?, What if I am a complete disaster at diving? and How did you even know I was up? You were snoring!

It’s my third night in Mozambique, in the tiny town of Ponta Malongane – a stretch of beautiful beach with the occasional thatched roof dwelling that stretches for about 5 kilometer along the Indian Ocean, just north of the South African border. I’ve come to meet my friend, Caine, in this gem of the African continent for three weeks to dive and explore. Except, it’s been raining since I got here. With gale-force winds. And surf.

Read more…

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