VISIT OSPREYPACKS.COM

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Mountain Bike’

Deep Winter in the NW, a Playground for the Syncro Pack

February 1st, 2013

Our friends over at Pinkbike.com are serious about not letting adverse weather get in the way of a good time. As writer Colin Meagher puts it in this post, “My true love is epic XC and AM rides, and my riding starts in late fall for the simple reason that, during the World Cup race season, I don’t have much time to go mountain biking. My riding season really starts in November and I live in Seattle, which means cold, dark, and wet.”

Conditions like these may not be terrible by nature, but they can make for a challenge if you’re not prepared for the elements you’re sure to face. Naturally, then, Meagher is pretty attuned to picking out what will perform best — quite simply so he can do the same. Part of his round-up of 10 Suggestions to Beat the Chill includes our very own Osprey Syncro 20 pack. And here’s what he had to say about it:

Osprey would seem to be the new kid on the block for bike packs, having started making hydration packs only in 2009. Owner/lead designer Mike Pfotenauer designed his first pack at age 16 and founded Osprey Packs in 1974 in Santa Cruz, CA. Now their headquarters are in Cortez, Colorado, where they have ready access to a plethora of trails for testing. The Syncro Pack from Osprey is lightweight, streamlined, and has a ventilated harness – just the thing for all-day trail epics. The pack comes in three variations based upon storage volume: 10 liter, 15 liter, and 20 liter. All three feature a 100-denier triple-Ripstop ‘High Tenacity’ nylon body, a Lidlock helmet clip, a three-liter hydration bladder, a variety of pockets for storage, and mesh side pockets for quick-stash items. Notable details are Osprey’s magnetic sternum buckle for holding the bite-valve, and an integrated rain cover that was a key selling point for me. I opted to test the Syncro 20, reckoning that while it has a LOT of cargo space, it also comes with compression straps, allowing me to streamline the fit of the pack in the event I wasn’t maxing its capacity. It has a main gear compartment, a smaller pouch for important gear like phones and wallets, as well as medium and a small-ish zippered stash pockets for tools, etc. The rain fly unfurls from its own zippered pouch on the underside of the pack.

Active Lifestyle, Gear Review, Lane Love, Osprey Life , , , , , , , , ,

10 Things Mountain Biking Will Teach You

September 6th, 2012

The State of Enduro Racing: Is It The Next Big Thing?

August 14th, 2012

The beauty of Enduro racing can be found on the transition stages with friends: riding along and enjoying the day.

I should preface this piece by stating that I am not an experienced Enduro racer, but rather one that has participated in several races, and likes the idea of a race that is like a ride with friends, but against the clock in the fun sections. The burgeoning excitement over this new style of racing is contagious, but I am unsure of whether to completely jump on the bandwagon of those claiming it’s the next big thing. Is it the next big thing? Can it dethrone the juggernauts that are DH racing and XC?

Read more…

Osprey Athletes, The Cycling Buzz , , , , , , , , ,

Kamloops Reminiscing: Getting Back To The Roots of Freeride

June 22nd, 2012

Stephen Matthews catching the last rays of the day.

I was invited along for a weekend of riding in the Kamloops by a small crew led by Seb Kemp, who was writing a story on the Loops for Dirt Magazine, and Reuben Krabbe, who was capturing the images for the article. I had not been to Kamloops in a long while, focusing my travels on other parts of BC, and more exotic locales in the previous few years. I feel strong ties to that arid part of the province though, having spent many weeks there in the early days of my freeride career, shooting for the New World Disorder movies and getting into the youthful trouble that seemed to follow our film shoots around in those days.

Read more…

Osprey Athletes, photos, The Cycling Buzz , , , , , , , ,

Singletrack Report: McKenzie River Trail

May 30th, 2012

Much of the trail runs next to the rushing river, creating a unique juxtapostion between the water and dirt.

The McKenzie River Trail (the MRT) is situated in Central Oregon, on the west side of the Cascades. This mountain range, predominantly made up of dormant and not-so-dormant volcanoes, does an efficient job of stopping the moisture from the Pacific Coast. On the west side you have temperate rainforests and old growth timber, and a stones throw to the east you are exploring an arid desert-like landscape. The MRT, being on the west side of the volcanoes, features towering Douglas fir, mossy forest floors, a raging river (complete with big waterfalls) and a cool climate. Apparently it rains frequently, but it was nice and dry for our visit down this renowned trail.

Read more…

adventure, Osprey Athletes, The Cycling Buzz, Travel , , , , , , , , ,

Lane Love: Mountain Biking in Style via Chris Akrigg

May 29th, 2012

The story of stunt biker Chris Akrigg‘s crash (and subsequent 40-foot fall) that resulted in a shattered femur is all too well known in the biking community all around the world. But now — a year later — Chris is well again, and back at doing what he loves to do: mountain biking with some serious class and finesse.

His first video back is proof that Chris has been hard at work recovering from his injury. It’s also a visual work of art. So today, after a fine long holiday weekend, we encourage you to sit back, relax and enjoy.

Every Monday on Lane Love, we’ll be featuring bicycling news, stories and photos from around the world. Have a lane that you love? Send us a photo! You can post it to our Facebook page or upload to our Flickr group and we might just feature it here on Lane Love.

Lane Love, video , , , , ,

Swiss Chalet: Eight Days of the Finest Swiss and French Downhill Mountain Bike Gems

May 22nd, 2012

Head buzzing from wine, stomach full of cheese, meat and bread, I careened haphazardly down the mountain, the Rhone Valley far below and a group of howling bike riders in the exact same boat as I following closely behind.

We were mid-way through an eight-day sampling of some of the finest Swiss and French downhill mountain bike gems. Some days took us to established bike parks, and other days to obscure trails hidden to the general public, and only discovered through a combination of bribing locals, studying maps and some good ‘ol fashioned luck.

Read more…

International, Osprey Athletes, Travel , , , , , , , , , ,

Travel Tuesday: Three Sure-fire Ways to Recover from Jet lag

May 15th, 2012
by Serena Bishop Gordon

Three sure-fire ways to recover from jet lag…

  1. Mountain Biking: Two wheels and tacky trails
  2. Coffee and Cake
  3. Whiskey Tasting

Our trajectory to Scotland felt like traveling into the future, or maybe the past – but instead of a clean break, we lost half a day, never saw the sun go down and arrived in Scotland after close to 24 hours of consistent daylight. Exhausted but invigorated, we did our best to beat jet lag. Our first full day in Peebles, Scotland, located in the Borders Region just 40 kilometers south of Edinburgh, presented us with relatively clear skies and loads to explore.

Read more…

Bike, Osprey Athletes, Outdoor Activities, travel , , , , , , , , , , ,

Trail Opening Celebrations in British Columbia

May 2nd, 2012

No better cause for celebration than some fresh mountain bike trail!

With the arrival of spring comes the introduction of new trails, poking up out of the melting snow like so many April flowers. They may have been lovingly crafted over the previous summer, granting a lucky few passage before the winter took hold, or they are a result of a trail builder’s many dark, wet, cold days digging and sculpting while others are riding powder on the higher reaches of the mountains (myself included).

Regardless of when they were built, these fresh nuggets of mountain biking pleasure reveal themselves to us in the spring, bringing exciting new experiences to share with our friends. New climbs to conquer, gaps to clear, or technical DH lines to master, these handcrafted pieces of dirt artistry hold in them the potential for another season’s worth of adventure, fun and challenge.

Nowhere is this celebrated more than at a trail opening. I grew up in Nelson, a town where these events were revered, looked forward to. The trail builder was not asked about certain nuances of their work in progress, but rather the details of the celebration that would take place once the trail was complete.

The openings would be a raucous affair, including all the characters that made my home what it was. More frat party than group ride, entire crowds would gather around key features on the new trail, cheering on the local legends and heckling others that timidly approached the line. Riders, spurred on by the crowd, took their risk taking to a whole other level, greeted by loud cheers upon success, and catcalls and laughter with failure. This would continue all the way down the trail, adding an element of spectator sport to the ride.

At the trail end, the rowdy group would then spill out onto the beach, or backyard, or backroad and the real trail opening celebrations would commence. My few friends and I were youngsters amongst this motley group of mountain freaks, and we would watch from the fringes, content with the ride we just had the chance to share with this crew. Eventually we would pull ourselves away, resigned to a curfew imposed by parents, riding away from the crackling bonfire, skunky clouds of smoke, and laughing voices recalling trails of the past, and talk of ones in the future.

I was happy to see that the trail opening tradition is being revived here on the Coast, perhaps in a slightly more commercial fashion, but managing to keep the raw excitement and spirit of a new trail launch party. Ted Tempany in Squamish is dropping the ropes on his new masterpiece, Full Nelson, on May 5th. With support from the Province of BC, SORCA, Anthill Films and Red Bull, Ted and others toiled over this berm and jump-filled snake run all winter, and are launching it to the public this coming weekend. The Red Bull-sponsored party is an all-ages celebration, unlike the trail openers of my youth. Lawlessness aside, the spirit is still there: a party to commemorate the hard work of some dedicated and visionary trailbuilders, and a chance to have some fun with your buddies on a brand new mountain bike trail.

Osprey Athletes, The Cycling Buzz , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday Round Up: Mud, Rain and Wind is No Match For an Osprey

March 23rd, 2012

We see a lot of great photos throughout the week. So, we thought it was high-time we started rounding up some of our faves each week and highlighting one each Friday on our blog to inspire our weekend adventures. We call it the Osprey Round Up.

Tyler Coplea posted this great shot on Twitter this week from his ride over the weekend: “Massive rain, mud, and wind was no match for my BMC TE29 or awesome OSPREY pack!” Definitely looks like those storm clouds were rolling in.

Now, who’s ready for some spring singletrack? Happy Friday!

Tyler Coplea is a bike racer for the US BMC Mountain Bike Team while also in search for the greatest espresso in the world.

Bike, Friday Round-up, photos , , , ,

Watch Opsrey on YouTubeCheck out Osprey Photos on FlickrLike Osprey on FacebookFollow Osprey on TwitterOsprey on Instagram
OSPREY BlogMEDIA Spot
Osprey Packs   115 Progress Circle Cortez CO 81321 USA  telephone +1 970-564-5900
Toll-Free: Customer Service +1 866-284-7830   Warranty/Returns +1 866-314-3130
VISIT OSPREYPACKS.COM

© 2014 Osprey Packs, Inc. All Rights Reserved.