VISIT OSPREYPACKS.COM

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Mountain Bike’

Osprey Verve Hydration Pack Takes Singletracks Editors’ Choice Award

October 17th, 2013

Osprey

Singletracks spent some quality time checking out quality gear this year, and at Interbike in particular. Its editors came away with some great knowledge of the best cycling gear the year of 2013 has had to offer. Here’s how they put it:

The 2013 model year is quickly winding down, and all the companies at Interbike 2013 were displaying the latest and greatest products about to hit showroom floors for 2014. A couple of weeks ago we announced the Top MTB Gear of 2013, as rated by you, our members, in the mountain bike gear database.

Now it’s our turn: we’ve called on our blog team members to choose the best mountain bike gear of the year.

We’d definitely recommend reading the entire post, as it’s chock full of great gear. But we’ll hone in on one specific pick that’s naturally near and dear to us here at Osprey HQ. The Best Women’s Gear was none other than the Osprey Verve. And here’s what Singletracks says about it:

In one week in Park City we took on two different rides of 4+ hours, and having a pack that would hold 3 liters of water, several snacks, a rain jacket, and more, was crucial. The Osprey Verve was up to the task. The padded mesh shoulder straps kept the pack comfortable during even the longest ride, and being able to adjust those straps meant that during rocky downhills the pack stayed firmly in place.

-mtbikerchick

Thanks for the love, Singletracks!

Active Lifestyle, Bike, Osprey Culture, Osprey Life, Product, Retail Promotions, Southwest Colorado, The Cycling Buzz , , , , , , , , , ,

Riding in zee Alps, Italian Style

October 4th, 2013
Climbing up the tunnel next to the Mauvoisin Dam

Climbing up the tunnel next to the Mauvoisin Dam

Having recently wrapped up three weeks of guiding Big Mountain Bike Adventures trips in Switzerland, my mind is alight with multiple moments of adventure, almost too many to distill singular experiences from. It’s probably easier to just summarize an entire trip as a whole. And while  I was tempted to do this, there was, indeed, one particular day that stood out amongst all the others.

The stark contrast of this day is not so much about the riding itself. The ride did feature some spectacular singletrack, but the uniqueness of the day was more about how it allowed us to travel with our bikes. Travel in the sense of moving through terrain; achieving numerous objectives over the course of a day while focused on a final destination, one very different from the beginning of the adventure.

The day started cold and clear in Lourtier, our sleepy little homebase tucked into the postcard-perfect Val de Bagnes, Switzerland. I had made the executive decision to postpone this particular outing a couple of days due to a low freezing level and poor weather, and looking out the window at a splitter blue sky, I felt very self congratulatory and guide-like. Taking advantage of this perfect weather window, our group powered back a Swiss breakfast (mostly bread, cheese and meat) and headed out.

The climb begins as quintessentially as a Swiss climb should: in a tunnel. The tunnel bores up through the mountainside next to the Mauvoisin Dam, at 250 meters tall, it is the highest arched dam in Europe. The tunnel is faintly lit, with water seeping through the ceiling. We climb up the narrow dirt track, sporadically sniping sights of the dam and lake below us through small ports in the rock. Finally, the tunnel ends, and we emerge, blinking, into blinding sunlight on the other side, a fantastic view of mountains and water and glaciers and rivers spilling out in front of us. Inspired by the sight we bend into a grinding road climb that eventually gives way to an even more oppressive hike-a-bike that finally relents to a merely painful climb, all of this getting us closer to the Fenetre du Durand, a 2800m col that marks the border between Switzerland and Italy.

Into the merely painful part of the climb. Epic views though!

Into the merely painful part of the climb. Epic views though!

As we climb, the air becomes sharper, distilled by the last few days of freezing temperatures. The crisp air seems to bring out our surroundings in flawless relief. Snow-capped peaks tower above the distinct singletrack that stretches out in front of our tires, and as we crest the col, Italy beckons below, a different landscape perhaps only in perspective, but beckoning us onwards in perfect detail.

Approaching the col, with Mt Gele looming behind.

Approaching the col, with Mt Gele looming behind.

The ride down is a glorious amalgamation of flowy trail, technical rock features, and everything in between. While down is the general direction, we traverse through the valley for a long distance on a perfectly graded “bisse,” or ancient waterway designed to re-direct water from the glaciers to mid-mountain fields and towns. As we descend the air becomes warmer, as one would imagine it would, descending into Italy. It all seems so perfect.

Smooth Italian singletrack.

Smooth Italian singletrack.

The final descent is long and winding, on a rarely visited trail that recently revealed itself thanks to some keen map reading and some valuable local knowledge. We revel in the secrecy of the spot, shredding down the rolling singletrack. At one point the trail points down through a perfectly-spaced group of larch trees, the forest floor nothing but knee-high vibrant green grasses, the trail cutting a straight line through. The afternoon sun dapples the grass, as a light wind creates a wild kaleidoscope of light in front of our tires. Minds blown, we rocket through the trees and exit out on the road far below, coasting down to the Italian town of Aosta for eagerly awaited beers.

After spending the day bundled up in the high mountains, it is an abrupt change to find ourselves in the old town of Aosta. The sun is warm, and as we relax and drink beers we witness a perfect slice of Italian life unfold around us. The striking differences between our morning’s departure and where we are now help to gel the unique experiences of the day together, and we celebrate two-wheeled travel, Italian style.

Story and photos by Joe Schwartz, Osprey Athlete

adventure, Bike Europe, Bikes Around the World, Osprey Athletes, travel , , , , , , , , , , ,

Big Mountain Enduro: Moab

October 2nd, 2013

“When people think of Moab, they think of all the red rock, and the rivers, and the canyons and they don’t really think of golden aspens and high alpine peaks — but it’s a big part of what Moab’s all about.”

The Big Mountain Enduro mountain bike race in Moab is all about that, sprinkled with a little bit of competition, by bike. Check it out!

Big congrats to our very own Osprey Athlete Macky Franklin for competing this epic ride.

Active Lifestyle, Bike, Events, Osprey Athletes, Osprey Culture, video , , , , , , , , , , ,

Where to Ride: Breckenridge Mountain Biking Tips

August 1st, 2013

So, you’re in Breckenridge for the myriad of cycling events that are happening, and you need to know where to get out and ride yourself. We’ve got you covered! Rachel Zerowin from bikebreck.com has the inside scoop on the best trails to get after, and she’s shared those with us here. Read and ride!
French Gulch
The French Gulch area of Breckenridge offers both short loops that can be ridden by a variety of abilities (try the B&B trail to the Reiling Dredge for a mellow out-and-back), as well as access to the community’s vast trail network. Connect to pristine singletrack along the Colorado Trail for a major ride or keep it short with an afternoon loop through historic mine sites.  French Gulch is incredible in fall.
Carter Park
Easily accessed from town, the Carter Park switchbacks lead to a loop via Moonstone and B-Line (an advanced trail with wooden features). Or, continue uphill on the Barney Ford trail and descend big berms on V3, one of the newest additions to the town trail network. V3 drops riders into the French Gulch area; how convenient.
Baker’s Tank/Aspen Alley
Boreas Pass Road, once a railroad route, offers a graded, mellow climb. Descend via the Baker’s Tank trail; advanced riders can descend all the way into town via the Aspen Alley and Illinois Gulch trails. Make the ride longer by adding an out-and-back on the Blue River Trail. This area and French Gulch are
spectacular in fall.
For Breckenridge maps, trail conditions and more, visit BreckenridgeTrails.org.

A dedicated fan of fun, Rachel Zerowin loves exploring and writing about the outdoors, especially when it relates to cycling. As the public relations manager for
GoBreck, she gets to do a bit of both during work hours in Breckenridge, Colorado. Check out more of Rachel’s work on BreckConnection.com or say hello on Twitter @ColoradoSummit.

Active Lifestyle , , , , ,

Whoops Trail

June 28th, 2013

Professional downhill mountain bike racer Dennis Yuroshek sent us this awesome video, accompanied with this to say:

Carolynn and I are spending some time here in Bend, Oregon trying to find a place to call home. In the meantime we shred trail just a few minutes outside of downtown. Whoops trail is one of Carolynn’s favorites to ride, watch to find out why!

Thanks to Dennis for sharing!

Active Lifestyle, Osprey Athletes, video , , , , ,

Forcing Nature at the Whistler Bike Park

May 23rd, 2013

I usually try to avoid the opening weekend of the Whistler Bike Park. Some reasons for my refusal to participate in this annual event are paltry, being that there are just a few muddy trails open, huge lines and the fact that other Sea to Sky venues are in mint shape this time of year, including, well, everywhere else.

All of that aside, I went this year. I think the Whistler Corp would like to hear that it was because of their barrage of marketing prior to the lifts firing up. Not really, although I did enjoy the first Force of Nature Video released before opening, featuring their motley bunch of bike athletes. The video shows riders carving perfect corners and lofting sculpted lips in what looks like epic mid-season conditions. Pretty convincing stuff, but the deciding factor for me was some good ‘ol fashioned arm-twisting by a group of buddies. A deal was struck where we worked out a balance of park and pedal, in a few Sea to Sky locations, over this Canadian long weekend.

It was a good decision. The bike park was all-time. The trail crew put in their due diligence, preparing almost every lower mountain trail in time for the gates to drop. The dirt was tacky and the riding was heroic. We had a casual start to the day, nothing like the kids who waited in line from 3 a.m. in order to secure first chair. The casual start was no hindrance though, as we were greeted by mellow lift lines that grew progressively larger over the afternoon. The wait in line was welcome though, as I could rest my cramping hands and catch up with friends. “How was your winter?” and “Epic conditions, eh?” were refrains echoing through the queue.

I had my own “Force of Nature” Friday night after a questionable chicken burrito wreaked havoc on my guts for the next 36 hours. I almost pulled the plug and hightailed back to Vancouver to recuperate, but the weekend was heading into high gear, so I decided hang around to see if things would improve.

The next day dawned wet and rainy, and my guts were still churning something fierce, so we abandoned the “official” opening day of the Park for a pedal in Squamish. A lush rainforest met us there, along with some fun new trails that magically sprung up over the winter, not unlike the mass proliferation of green undergrowth that appears with the spring rain.

The weekend was a blur of riding, eating and sleeping. My food poisoning waned, so with renewed energy I sampled more bike park, usually riding the lifts in the morning until the lift line got too oppressive, and then trading bikes for a pedal in the Whistler Valley or Pemberton. An amazing way to spend this Victoria Day long weekend!

Osprey Athletes , , , , , , , ,

Cycling on Top of the World

April 25th, 2013

We love it when Osprey owners share shots of their outdoor adventures with us, especially when they’re as amazing as this!

The above shot — which makes her mountain biking buddy look like he’s cycling on top of the world — was posted by Andrea Codda.

Happy adventuring and happy cycling!

Active Lifestyle, adventure, Bike Europe, photos , , ,

The Osprey Verve Shows Off on the Arizona Trails

March 14th, 2013

We love when we get the opportunity to see our packs in action — especially when our very own customers send shots of themselves or their friends getting everything out of a pack we had ever intended for it. The photo above, posted to our Facebook Page by Melissa Liebling, is an incredible shot of the Osprey Verve 9 doing it’s duty out on the trail.

Thanks to Melissa for sharing!

Active Lifestyle, Osprey Life, Pedaling Change, photos , , , , ,

Thawing Out In Moab

March 5th, 2013

Snow on the LaSal mountains make a beautiful backdrop for the slickrock of the Moab Brands trails.

Spring has sprung in Moab, UT and Poison Spider Bicycles celebrated this past weekend with their annual Moab Thaw event. Osprey supported the event with a fleet of demo packs that were available for riders checking out the latest and greatest bikes from Yeti, Niner, Pivot and Ellsworth. Thaw HQ was at the Moab Brands trailhead where food and drink were provided so riders could focus on getting as many demo rides in as their winter legs would allow. Conditions were perfect with blue skies, calm winds and temps in the 60s.

The Poison Spider event really is a great way to thaw out from a cold, snowy winter and get excited about the approaching cycling season. This one is worth putting on your calendar and scheduling a trip from wherever you might be. Watch the Poison Spider web site next winter for 2014 registration details. In the meantime, check out some of the shots from this year’s event below.

Events, photos , , ,

Prepare, the Moab Thaw is Here

March 1st, 2013

March 1st is upon us, and that can only mean one thing: the Moab Thaw is here for another weekend of events, riding, food and, of course, schwag. The Moab Thaw takes place annually at Poison Spider Bicycles in Moab, Utah and can be summed up as a giant, weekend-long mountain bike demo that takes place on the Moab single track trails. Naturally, there will be a slew of Yetis, Konas, Niner and other mountain bikes to demo with an after-hours continuation event at the Blu Pig BBQ and Blues Joint on Saturday night. The formal schedule of festivities goes as follows:


FRIDAY

Noon: Women’s skills clinic and group rides open to all skill levels, shuttle included meet at PSB- led by Moab Mountain Bike Instruction.

5 pm  to 8:30 pm : Meet and greet party at Love Muffin Café catered

SATURDAY

10 am to 4  pm: Demos, shuttles, games and fun! At the Moab brand trails

11 am: Legends Ride- Ride with multiple legends of the cycling industry. Led by World Champion Greg Herbold.

1-3pm: Lunch from Pasta Jays

8 pm: Party, raffle, Hors d’oeuvres at the Blue Pig ——Frame Giveaway!

SUNDAY

10 am to 4 pm:Donuts and Coffee from Rim Tours, Demos, shuttles, games and fun!  At the Moab brand trails

We’ll be there providing free pack demos focused on the Spring 2013 hydration line, but we’ll also have a full display of what’s new for Spring 2013 so you can peruse to your heart’s desire. If you’re looking to get a new pack, we’ll also be  providing professional pack sizings and fittings and as always, there will be daily giveaways that you won’t want to miss.

You can register for the Moab Thaw here today, March 1st, through Sunday, March 3rd. Tickets cost $39.95 and include an event pass for all three days of activities, a T-shirt, a pasta lunch and lots of schwag. We’ll see you there to Thaw out!

Bike, Events, Osprey Culture , , , , , , ,

Watch Opsrey on YouTubeCheck out Osprey Photos on FlickrLike Osprey on FacebookFollow Osprey on TwitterOsprey on Instagram
OSPREY BlogMEDIA Spot
Osprey Packs   115 Progress Circle Cortez CO 81321 USA  telephone +1 970-564-5900
Toll-Free: Customer Service +1 866-284-7830   Warranty/Returns +1 866-314-3130
VISIT OSPREYPACKS.COM

© 2014 Osprey Packs, Inc. All Rights Reserved.