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Year of the River: Setting the White Salmon River Free

October 26th, 2011

We’re working with American Whitewater to protect a river close to home — the Dolores River. But today, we’re pretty excited to celebrate with them on a momentous victory in the Northwest. Today at 1p.m. Mountain Time, Condit Dam’s de-construction will begin with a boom when crews blast a tunnel through the 95-year old, 125-foot dam.

via The Cleanest Line:

Boaters, flyfishermen, and long-time community members are looking forward to a White Salmon River that once again flows freely. Documentary film-maker Andy Maser is tracking the story of Washington’s effort in his beautiful “Year of the River” series.


Stay tuned to Andy Maser’s website for first images from the blast, and you can also watch the main event live on the American Rivers website.

causes, Conservation, video , , ,

Huge Conservation Wins: Elwha and White Salmon Rivers in Washington to Run Free

September 14th, 2011

For all of us who love rivers, it’s time to celebrate!

This Saturday, work begins on the largest river restoration project in history. Over the next three years, crews will work on dismantling the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams on the Elwha — an action that will allow the river to flow freely for the first time in 100 years and restore 70+ miles of salmon and steelhead habitat. At 210 feet tall, Glines Canyon Dam will be the tallest dam ever removed.

And it gets better: next month, crews will blast the 125-foot tall Condit dam on the White Salmon River, setting the river free in a matter of hours.

While we may have to wait a few years to see salmon return and the rivers return to the wild rivers they were 100 years ago, this marks a huge change in momentum. Dams are being removed all over the country, with these three being the most significant of all. From all of us here at Osprey, thank you to American Rivers, American Whitewater and everyone who had a hand in these victories. It’s time to celebrate!

To get just a taste of the Elwha and why this restoration is so important, check out this beautiful short film by Andy Maser.

causes, Conservation , , , ,

Friday Round-Up: Summer Water Reading

August 19th, 2011

Unless you’ve been living in a deep, dark cave… You may have noticed that there is a lot of cool stuff going on out there. So, we thought it was high-time we started rounding up some of our faves each Friday. Every month, we’ll be choosing a theme that fits with the Osprey lifestyle. It’s August which means it’s time to take advantage of the last weeks of summer, and what better way than getting in the water? This month we’re all about swimming holes, waterfalls, ocean breaks and waterways of all kinds. Welcome to the Osprey Friday Round-Up!

This week we’re bringing you a few excerpts from great water related articles around the web to beef up your reading list. Enjoy!

For all its obscurity, the Lower Pecos flows through one of the loveliest and most pristine landscapes in America. Spring-fed and limestone-bottomed, the river has a clarity matched only by its wild tropical color schemes, which would remind you of a ­Corona beer commercial except that the colors are far more varied. It is both a whitewater river, with dozens of rapids from Class I through Class IV, and a giant aquarium—jammed with spotted gar, catfish, perch, bluegill, and carp—where you can watch a large­mouth bass wheel, rise, and hit your fly. The country around it is a sort of museum of Native American history, home to one of the greatest concentrations of ancient rock art in America.

And so it is surprising that, out beyond the 100th meridian, where vast commercial cultures have arisen to service affluent Americans desperate for a run down big, remote, mythic rivers, no one knows the Lower Pecos. Our predicament in the rapids is relatively simple, in one sense: we’re the only ones here.

-“The Lost River of Divine Reincarnation,” Outside Magazine

Read more…

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