October 28th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

Autumn in Yosemite: A Squash Soup Recipe from Osprey Athlete Beth Rodden

Last spring I became a mom for the first time.

It’s been a huge life change, one that I couldn’t have imagined, but so worth it in every regard. I knew I would have to adapt my climbing career while Theo was young and I was recovering from birth. But one thing that I didn’t anticipate was altering another passion of mine, cooking. Over the years, I’ve become incredibly excited about cooking and using good, quality food. With Theo, I quickly realized that involved recipes would have to take a backseat for a while. This is one of my favorite recipes that I have been cooking recently with the yummy local winter squash. I love that I can prepare it in different stages, allowing me to play with Theo in between. It also it great frozen and a perfect food for an active toddler. I hope you enjoy! – Beth Rodden


Beth Rodden’s Autumn Squash Soup


  • 2 winter squashes (Buttercup is my favorite, but I have also used Butternut and Kabocha)
  • 1 32 oz jar of chicken broth (or veggie broth)
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 3 teaspoons cinnamon


  1. Pre-heat oven to 400.
  2. Cut the squash in half, and de-seed them.
  3. Generously brush the flesh with olive oil and roast cut side down in a roasting pan.
  4. Bake for approximately 45-60 minutes depending on size of squash.
  5. Remove when the squash is tender when speared with a fork. Let cool then scoop out the flesh onto a plate.Soup
  6. Sauté chopped onion in a pan on the stove until the pieces are transluscent. Add the chopped garlic and spices and sauté for 4-5 minutes. Add the squash and broth.
  7. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 10 – 20 minutes to let the flavors permeate.
  8. Use and immersion blender or scoop into a normal blender, and blend until smooth.
  9. Top with parsley if you have the time and energy

:)  Enjoy!


Osprey Athlete Beth Rodden

Beth fell in love with the mountains and wanted nothing more than to travel the world exploring climbing areas. Over the next decade she became one of the most accomplished female climbers in43_432_lg the world. Beth has free climbed three routes on El Capitan, more than any other woman. She has also established some of the hardest traditional climbs and sport climbs in the world by a woman.

Over the past few years Beth has become very involved with clinics and working with young climbers across the country. Climbing has been her passion since childhood and she loves sharing that with young climbers today; working to  develop their skills and enthusiasm into good stewards for the sport. Beth has also developed a strong passion for local food systems. She is very engaged in bringing awareness that food sourced and grown locally is beneficial for the environment as well as people’s health. She is fortunate enough to split her time between Yosemite and the Bay Area, where she can pursue both her love of the mountains and climbing, and her love of good, quality food. When she’s not climbing she can be found cooking with food from the local farmers market, and spending time with her four legged companion, Max and her son, Theo.

Beth’s Favorite Pack:


FlapJill Series

December 3rd 2014 - Written by: alison

Holy Terror Farm: Fall Harvest with Alison Gannett

I love and I hate farming. It all started with a quest to grow and raise all our own food five years ago. I even remember the last month I needed to actually go to the grocery store – April 2010.


Certainly there are a few key exceptions – coffee for my hubby Jason, chocolate for me, spices that we can’t grow, and life-maintaining Real Salt from Utah – for ourselves and the animals.


But back to the love and hate thing – I adore having this connection to our land, this feeling that we are doing something immensely important, and this incredible sense of self-reliance. Everyday I learn something new that my grandmother must have done her whole life.


She never had to figure out make all this garden/orchard/pasture bounty to last for months – to render lard/tallow, make butter, dry herbs and veggies, can tomatoes, ferment peppers/cucumbers, cure squash/pumpkins/nuts/shallots/onions/animal forages (corn, sunflowers, barley, wheat)….the list is endless.


The days are long, tedious, exhausting – feed, water, harvest, cook, feed, water, irrigate, harvest again, dry, preserve, freeze, jar, vacuum seal. When tasked with putting up all our food for the long winter, quitting is not an option. Skipping out for a bike ride and leaving the tomatoes to freeze and burst or the walnuts to be stolen by the squirrels he “inbox” is never empty.


But in the end, with the root cellar and freezers full of our 10 months of hard labor, we are pleasantly content to enter the long winter. Now finishing our fifth year, it has gotten a bit easier as we have figured out our ancestor’s systems. And while I wish we could take irresponsible vacations together more often, the “prepper” in me feels ready just in case.


In reality, I will most likely just have the world record amount of our farm food in all of my Osprey Packs (Transporters, Ozones, Snowplay) as I travel to my many KEEN Rippin Chix Steep Skiing/Adventure/Powder Camps this winter – Silverton, Crystal, Whitewater, Red Mtn and to anywhere the snow is DUMPING! Join me?

Think Snow!

November 9th 2010 - Written by: Kelsy


Unlike most autumns, October in Montana remained sunny and warm. In many other years I have been climbing ice during October… Not this one. The autumn of 2010 will go down in my books as one of  warmest and sunniest I have ever had. I spent most days climbing near home but did take a one week trip to Utah. The plan was to climb five big routes between Red Rocks and Zion in six days. Like many climbing trips and plans this one was subject to weather, physical well-being and many other fates of  the universe.

It had been raining for one week in both areas prior to our arrival. The soft Navajo sandstone face holds are notorious for breaking after such saturating storms, and camming units slide out of cracks with much more ease (especially the smaller sizes). Fortunately we had a back up plan: the severely overhanging limestone routes at the Cathedral crag and its neighboring Wailing Wall. These sport crags lie just outside of St. George, Utah roughly half-way (by road) between Red Rocks and Zion and tend to stay dry due to its geographic location and the steep nature of the rock.

We departed Vegas and drove through the night planning to arrive around 10am.  The “old reliable” truck, Earl Grey, decided to stop operating in the midst of the New River Gorge on I-15 right around 10 pm. After being towed we got a new battery at a 24-hour Walmart and replaced the alternator the next day.

The following day we pulled up to the crag and soon realized we were outnumbered 10-1 by gun-toting folks in orange — it was opening weekend for Utah’s short five-day hunting season. I was personally missing out on Montana’s opening weekend, but lucky for me our season lasts nearly a month. We found a spot to throw down and camp and stayed there the following three days waiting for the rain to pass out of Zion.  In those three days we climbed many a dazzling steep lines (see photos) on some of the best limestone I have touched.

The skies finally cleared the evening of our second day, but we needed to wait at least 24 hours for the stone to dry in Zion. So we checked out the Black and Tan wall.  No where near as good as The Cathedral, but at least we were climbing.

And finally we made our way to Zion, and got right on the route Monkey Finger (5.12 8 pitches). The climbing was going smoothly though the rock was still a bit wet.  At the top of the 3rd pitch I put my body in an odd position and suddenly my whole shoulder sublexed (not quite popping out of socket but damn close). It had never happened to me prior to that incident, and I sure as hell didn’t want to become the guy with the chronic shoulder problems. The trip was over. I finished the pitch, then we rappelled.

Unfortunately this particular climbing trip did not quite go as planned. However I did get to pass many a good days with a great old friend. We plan to reunite in the future to carry through with our larger objectives.  In the mean time I am back here in Montana diversifying my outdoor life, riding the bike a lot more, hunting, running and just taking it easy on the shoulder and rehabbing until it gets better.

On this very fine day the sun is still shining with temps in the 60’s, I have an elk roast slowly steaming away in a crock pot, and I just finalized some plans to do a rock trip to Spain and Morocco this winter! Injuries do suck, but it forces me to tap in to other outlets and embrace some new creativity.

hast la proxima,



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