VISIT OSPREYPACKS.COM

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘adventure’

Black Lake Chute–The Run of the Season

July 9th, 2014

The Black Lake Chute took me ten years to ski. All that time it teased me from Anchorage. Above my home it looked like a thin white thread tied to the summit of O’Malley Peak. It hung down the north face and draped off of the lower wall. It became my White Whale. Sometimes, between attempts, I’d try to talk myself out of it. It’s too dangerous. There’s plenty of other stuff to ski. But I wanted it so bad….

climb.chfront.stock-270

The Black Lake Chute in February. Cody and I were climbing a ridge near the Chute during an alpine climbing course.

 

IMG_0603

After numerous attempts, I finally got into the chute with the right conditions and the right partner: Roger Strong. The top 300 feet were 55 degrees above a big cliff. The consequences were too high for our liking to ski unroped. We did two raps to get into the chute.

 

ski.chfront.stock-515

Roger on the second rap into the chute. The run was 2,400 vertical feet. We hoped the style police wouldn’t bust us for a few short raps.

 

IMG_0625
Forty-five degrees, four inches of duff on solid chalk. The stuff of dreams. But it wasn’t a free-for-all and yelling for joy. The chute ended at the top of a 300-foot wall known as the Black Lake Climbs. 


IMG_0639

We used the front points of our aluminum crampons to traverse above the Black Lake Climbs. Don’t think about the 300-foot cliff below and the traverse is easy. Focus and repeat: “You’re on the ground. Breathe. You’re on the ground. Breathe. You’re on the ground.”

ski.chfront.stock-585

Yeeeeaaaahhhhh!!!! The satisfaction of a ski alpinist: the alpinists relief of surviving the climb combined with the skiers thrill of speed and good snow. Thanks for an incredible day Roger!

Bookmark
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • MySpace
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Propeller
  • Reddit

Osprey Athletes, Snowsports , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Osprey is going pro at the GoPro Mountain Games!

May 29th, 2014

GoPro Mountain Games 2014 | Osprey Packs

GoPro Mountain Games 2014 | Osprey Packs

The GoPro Mountain Games are the country’s largest celebration of adventure sports, music and the mountain lifestyle and they return to Vail, June 5-8, 2014. Over 3,000 professional and amateur athletes annually converge on the mountains and rivers of Vail to compete in 25 sports for over $110,000 in prize money. Spectating at the event is free and over 53,000 spectators annually attend for four days of athletes, art, music and mountains. A festival atmosphere engulfs Vail comprised of four expo and demo areas, nightly free concerts, an outdoor photography competition and an Outdoor Film Festival.

No matter how you get to Vail for the Summer Mountain Games, we assure you there are plenty of adventures on the way. Bring your toys, take some extra time and enjoy some of the best country in the United States. Perhaps you will end up like some of us and never leave.

2014 GoPro Mountain Games | Vail | Osprey Packs

We’re starting summer off right in Vail, CO, the weekend of June 5-8 2014 at the GoPro 2014 Mountain Games! Summer 2014 sporting events include steep, freestyle, sprint and full contact kayaking, rafting, mountain, road, and slopestyle biking, World Cup Bouldering, amateur climbing, fly fishing, stand up paddling, slackline and trail, mud and long distance running.

Here are some highlights from this year’s games: Read more…

Bookmark
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • MySpace
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Propeller
  • Reddit

Active Lifestyle, Events, Mountain Games, Osprey Culture, Osprey Life, Outdoor Activities , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Where is Tenerife?

May 27th, 2014

Osprey Athlete Joe Schwartz is a resident of British Columbia, Canada. He has been a professional mountain bike rider for over a decade, and was a featured rider in the New World Disorder series of bike movies, as well as other movie productions and TV shows (Ride Guide, Drop-In). Through his work with film companies he has been fortunate enough to travel all over the globe, riding in some very exotic locales. Joe is an ACMG certified backcountry ski guide, and has worked for numerous catski, heliski, and ski touring lodges all over BC. While mountain biking is his main love, Joe uses his skis as an escape mechanism. His past adventures include completing multi-day ski traverses throughout BC and achieving a number of committing descents in the BC Coast Range, the Canadian Rockies, and in the French Alps.

 

This is a question­­ normally asked in the initial research part of planning a trip somewhere exotic, before you’ve made any decisions, but I had already committed to this destination and legitimately had no idea where the island was. The reasons for this were a long winter of ski guiding, my Ireland-med school-attending girlfriend, our months apart from each other, and that Tenerife, one of the Canary Islands off the coast of Morocco, was the furthest south she could get a direct plane ticket to after a rainy winter in her new home of Cork. The plan was already in action, and I would have been happy to meet her on an oil rig in the middle of the Atlantic, so tickets to this Spanish island were booked, and then I started looking in to exactly where I was headed to.

Happy to be leaving winter behind at the Calgary airport

Happy to be leaving winter behind at the Calgary airport

Nice views of the ocean.

Nice views of the ocean.

Read more…

Bookmark
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • MySpace
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Propeller
  • Reddit

Bike, International, Osprey Athletes, The Cycling Buzz, Travel , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

#OspreyAt40: Our 40th Anniversary Celebration Continues!

April 2nd, 2014

OspreyAt40_Montage

When we launched our #OspreyAt40 photo contest earlier this year, we knew we’d see some amazing photos of your many adventures, travels and treks — but we were blown away by the number of phenomenal photos submitted by so many loyal Osprey fans. Thank you for sharing your memories with us — we’re honored to have been part of your hikes, backpacking trips, MTB rides, snow days, city walks, summits, sojourns and every other adventure you’ve had with an Osprey Pack on your back.

We’re going to continue to celebrate our 40th Anniversary throughout the year — so please stay tuned for other fun contests and prizes. In May, we’ll be premiering the full-length documentary “Osprey Packs: 40 Years in the Making.” In the meantime, below are the final winners selected by our internal judges for Round 4 of #OspreyAt40. (Or visit our gallery of all of the 40 winning #OspreyAt40 photos here.)

Thank you again for sharing your photos with us and for celebrating our 40th Anniversary!

Read more…

Bookmark
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • MySpace
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Propeller
  • Reddit

adventure, Backpacking, contest, Osprey Culture, Osprey Life, Outdoor Activities, photos, travel , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

50 Shades of Osprey

March 2nd, 2014

50ShadesCollage3

Osprey Athlete Payge McMahon is an adventure athlete, ‘rockin’ yogi’ and journalist who travels the world inspiring others to get outdoors, try new things and start checking off that bucket list.

In 2007, at the age of 33, my life changed forever. I bought my first Osprey Pack, an orange Stratos 24.  I loved it. It took me to places I never imagined. Read more…

Bookmark
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • MySpace
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Propeller
  • Reddit

Active Lifestyle, adventure, Backpacking, Bike, Hiking, Osprey Athletes, Outdoor Activities, Product, Snowsports, travel, Travel , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Kicking Off Round 4 of the #OspreyAt40 Photo Contest

February 24th, 2014

40thVintageBird-Adventure

Round 4 of #OspreyAt40 kicks off at 10:15 am PST, Tuesday, February 25th!

Round 4 is the final round of our 40-day giveaway celebrating our 40th Anniversary — it’s time to submit your favorite photo memory of Osprey Packs if you haven’t yet already! At the beginning of Round 4 of #OspreyAt40, we’ll once again reset the votes on all photo submissions back to “0.” Resetting the votes to “0″ tomorrow morning will mean that each entrant is once again eligible to automatically win a Limited Edition Transporter 40 pack if their photo submission is one of the first five photos to reach 40 votes on our contest page.

We launched this contest as a fun way to celebrate this milestone anniversary with the folks who’ve made the last 40 years possible: our fans. And we’ve been blown away by the amazing photos we’ve received of so many journeys, hikes, travels and treks. We’re so glad to have been a part of those incredible adventures! Below are 10 more #OspreyAt40 winners, including the 5 photos selected as Round 2 winners by our judges, along with the top 5 Round 3 winners selected by voters.

Good luck everyone! If you’re a US resident who hasn’t yet entered but would like to, please do so here: tinyurl.com/OspreyAt40

Official rules available here.

Max_L_OspreyAt40_Winner16 Read more…

Bookmark
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • MySpace
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Propeller
  • Reddit

contest, Osprey Culture, Osprey Life, Outdoor Activities, photos , , , , , , , , , , ,

40 Years of Adventure: #OspreyAt40 Photo Contest

February 7th, 2014

Long Start to the Journey: Help Osprey Ambassador Chris Gallaway share his Appalachian Trail story

January 24th, 2014
Chris Gallaway- before and after shots.

Chris Gallaway- Before the AT and after the AT.

 

Osprey Ambassador Chris Gallaway is seeking support through Kickstarter to make his a film, “The Long Start to the Journey” a reality. January 31st is the campaign deadline to support this compelling documentary about the Appalachian Trail and if the campaign does not meet its goal no funding will be collected and given to the movie.

In support of Chris’s Kickstarter campaign, we’re giving away an Exos 48 Superlight Backpack to the next donor to pledge $220. The Exos 48, our newest ultra-light technical backpack, is a masterful combination of ounce-shaving, durable materials and a feather-weight internal frame to keep you fast and comfortable on your next journey. Your pack will have a “The Long Start to the Journey” patch sewn on to commemorate your part in making this film possible. Note: We’ll need to get your unique sizing before fulfilling this reward and you must be a resident of the US to be eligible.

To support The Long Start to the Journey and learn more about the campaign, visit www.maketheATmovie.com.

To follow Chris’s journey on the trail last year, visit www.theATmovie.com.

 

Long Start To The Journey

 

A question I have often heard since completing my 7-month thru-hike on the Appalachian Trail is how the experience changed me. That’s a difficult one for me to answer, and it’s probably better addressed by people who know me well and have observed me from the outside. The images above were taken at the beginning and end of my hike (the third, cold morning in February on Blood Mountain Georgia and the last day in September as I walked down from Katahdin). While I know that these two self-portraits encompass a host of experiences and some of the most significant changes of my life, it’s difficult for me to articulate what’s different between them. Read more…

Bookmark
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • MySpace
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Propeller
  • Reddit

Active Lifestyle, adventure, AT Trail, causes, Conservation, Ditch Your Car, Guest post, Hiking, Non-profits, Osprey Culture, Osprey Life, Outdoor Activities, travel, Uncategorized , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Guest Blogger Ben White on Returning to the Familiar

December 6th, 2013

Ben White is a New England native who moved to Salt Lake City to attend the University of Utah. He loves skiing in the backcountry, climbing, mountain biking and generally messing about in the mountains.

Playing in the mountains is an incredible thing. Be it skiing, climbing, biking, hiking, paddling or any other fantastic activity, it’s all fun. However, when the trees change color from green to fire or from grey to green, the fun stops, or at the very least, changes. From when I was twelve until about fourteen or fifteen, the loss of snow in the mountains brought about foul moods and boredom. Once I started mountain biking, it was still a bummer to lose ski season, but riding a bike became just so darn fun. With the addition of climbing on the list of fun things to do, there’s a whole new dimension to be added in both the warm and cold seasons. While some people might get jittery at their favorite crag melting out or trails being dry enough to ride, I have always been captivated by the first snow of the year

So happy to be back on snow after too much dry ground

So happy to be back on snow after too much dry ground

It’s December now, so there has been snow on the ground and all the resorts are open, and while the feeling of returning to the familiar is slipping away, there is still more to be had. In November, feeling the snap of bindings and hearing the sound of skis sliding on snow went from being pleasurably nostalgic about the last season to the way things should be. Watching the mountains fill in and returning to areas that need more snow is just happening now.

As much fun as Utah is, New Hampshire still feels like home after skiing the 48, and watching Tuckerman Ravine fill in via webcam is almost as fulfilling as watching Snowbird fill in. Checking the snowpack for places like the La Sals, Idaho and the Pacific Northwest by word of mouth and looking at trip reports has me excited for what is to come.

Myself in the winter and my friend Andrea in the summer at the same place. Waiting for things to fill in or melt out can feel like forever.

Myself in the winter and my friend Andrea in the summer at the same place. Waiting for things to fill in or melt out can feel like forever.

Seeing clean tracks in an area for the first time that season is like a notice saying “hey everybody, it’s good in here again!” It’s like seeing people at a roadside crag or with smiles on their faces and mud on their backs from riding for the first time in the spring.

We all love playing outside, and often times it’s hard to choose a favorite activity. The feeling of the familiar returning after a few months of missing it is something exciting, comforting and all-together pleasurable. For me, the snap of carabiners and the whir of a hub are always enjoyable, but just don’t do it for me the same way that the zip-zop of skins followed by muffled sliding on snow does.

Bookmark
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • MySpace
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Propeller
  • Reddit

Active Lifestyle, adventure, Guest post, Osprey Culture, Osprey Life, Outdoor Activities , , ,

Mountain Biking Multiple Meccas in America

December 5th, 2013
On the road again...

On the road again…

Americans get behind things. I mean, when there is something Americans believe in, they wholeheartedly invest their time and energy into making it a reality. Us laid-back Canadians might poo-poo this idea, but in many ways it is true. How do you think the good ol’ US of A grew into a superpower in the span of a few short centuries? Or, look at the near-rabid following of the Tea Party, or hardcore evangelism. When people wanna believe, they stick to their guns (forgive the pun).

It’s no different with mountain biking, and the way mountain towns have latched onto the sport as a way of bringing tourist dollars into their communities. This fall I traveled to America with some friends from Vancouver, on a road trip to some of the new, and old, mountain bike meccas of the Lower 49.

In the span of ten action-packed days we drove to and rode in Sun Valley, Moab, Fruita and Park City. All mountain bike hotspots in their own right, and deserving of a “mecca” status for different reasons.

Sun Valley, our first stop after leaving Vancouver, was a spot I had visited years ago on a Bike Magazine assignment, driving through the American MidWest in Honda Elements and riding the most obscure spots we could find. Sun Valley is far from unknown, especially in the ski circles, and the riding surrounding Ketchum and Hailey, the two towns that make up Sun Valley, is world class.

Our host this time was Greg Randolph, the director of public relations and social media for the Sun Valley Marketing Alliance. Greg has a rich background in cycling, and straight up loves where he lives, which shows in all of his marketing efforts and events hosted. Lucky for us mountain bikers, he does play favourites, organizing an annual mountain bike festival, developing a detailed trail map and generally stoking out the mountain bike community whenever possible.

Chasing the last rays of sun in Sun Valley

Chasing the last rays of sun in Sun Valley

We rode two days of perfect singletrack, from sinuous desert rips to flowing loops in the forest. We hit the road after riding the Prairie/Miner Loop, a mini-epic that took us up into the fresh snowline of the alpine, and where Greg had to get in a dip in one of the close-to-freezing-over lakes. “I never miss a swim up here!” he exclaimed, surveying all the new snow in the high country. With ambassadors like this, Sun Valley is going to continue to attract keen riders for years to come.

A late night drive, along with a stop at a suspect Taco Bell in Salt Lake City, took us to Moab, our southernmost destination and a spot I had never ridden. Yes, I had never ridden. That’s blasphemy according to many riders who consider Moab the true Mecca, and make pilgrimages whenever possible. I thought I had to check it out for myself.

Ripping down Porcupine Rim, Moab.

Ripping down Porcupine Rim, Moab.

Moab is a place that seemingly needs to do no work to attract mountain bike tourism. Gracing covers of magazines worldwide, the surreal landscape of the Utah slickrock has implanted itself in mountain biker psyche as the place to go, as the ultimate mountain bike experience. This is evident in the number of bike shops, guiding outfits and shuttle services that dot the town. While the Slickrock trail has sustained this mountain bike boom for years, Moab is not one to rest on its laurels. The Whole Enchilada, a 42 km, 7,000-foot downhill epic draws thousands of riders each year, as does Captain Ahab, a newly-handbuilt maze carved out of the unforgiving sandstone that offers perfect flow its entire length. The mountain bike community in Moab has seen the sport evolve, and has evolved the trail offerings to match.

It's not a Moab visit without a Slickrock Trail loop!

It’s not a Moab visit without a Slickrock Trail loop!

Connecting the blue dots in Moab.

Connecting the blue dots in Moab.

We were welcomed to Fruita by a three-story banner of a mountain biker in action plastered to the side of a grain elevator towering over the small town. A sure sign that the community is on board! As we only had the day to check out the riding, we tried to maximize our efficiency and headed to the 18 Road trail system. We were not alone here, and for a mid-week day the parking lot was surprisingly busy. The trails were flowy and fun, and we looped back and forth underneath the Bookcliffs, sampling as much singletrack as we could possibly muster. We ended the day with amazing pizza at the Hot Tomato Café in town, a business born of the mountain bike boom, owned by mountain bikers, and a rad spot that definitely catered to the two-wheeled brethren.

Sampling the sweet singletrack of Fruita.

Sampling the sweet singletrack of Fruita.

Another late night drive (and more shady Taco Bell) took us to Park City, our last stop on this roadtrip. We had planned this stop based on some rumours, and a friend who promised great singletrack. I had not ever heard of the riding here, but was willing to give it a try. When we arrived it was obvious that Park City is ready to show the world what they have to offer. With over 400 miles (yes, 400) of trails, three lift-served bike parks (and some free public bus shuttle zones) this place is a mecca in the making. IMBA apparently knows how good it is here, and this year gave Park City the first (and so far, only) Gold Level Ride Center designation.

IMBA gold-level singletrack high above Park City

IMBA gold-level singletrack high above Park City

It was certainly golden in Park City, with vibrant fall colours from the aspens lining the long singletrack climbs and epic descents. We rode trails straight out of our condo, and did shuttles to 10,000 feet. The mix of trail styles was amazing. The main street indicated the level of commitment Park City had to mountain biking as well. Every lamp post was adorned in bike-focused slogans; “IMBA Gold Level,” “Epic Singletrack” and more. Money abounds in this wealthy area, but smart minds prevail also, and are not letting the mountain bike tourism opportunity pass them by.

Fall colours in Park City

Fall colours in Park City.

Real life was calling the desk jockeys on our road trip, and we sadly pulled up stakes and made the painfully long drive back to Canada. During the drive we had plenty of time to reflect on the impact that mountain biking is making in these small communities, and marveled at how Americans really do get behind whatever they believe is a good thing. Lucky for us, in these cases, it’s singletrack.

Bookmark
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • MySpace
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Propeller
  • Reddit

adventure, Bike, Osprey Athletes, The Cycling Buzz, Travel , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Watch Opsrey on YouTubeCheck out Osprey Photos on FlickrLike Osprey on FacebookFollow Osprey on TwitterOsprey on Instagram

OSPREY BlogMEDIA Spot
Osprey Packs   115 Progress Circle Cortez CO 81321 USA  telephone +1 970-564-5900
Toll-Free: Customer Service +1 866-284-7830   Warranty/Returns +1 866-314-3130
VISIT OSPREYPACKS.COM

© 2014 Osprey Packs, Inc. All Rights Reserved.