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Osprey Athletes

September 1st 2015 - Written by: Osprey Packs

The Mystery and Magnetism of the Mountains: Ben Clark Runs Nolan’s 14

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Morning of September 1, 2015: Ben summits peak #1, Mt. Massive wearing his Osprey Rev 12

Osprey Athlete Ben Clark is in currently in the midst of the awe-inspiring feat of traversing Nolan’s 14. What is Nolan’s 14? 

“After 15 years in obscurity, Nolan’s 14, a hundred-mile traverse of 14 14,000-foot peaks in 60 hours, emerges as a new test piece for elite mountain runners.” –National Geographic Adventure

Yes, that’s correct — completing Nolan’s 14 entails traversing 14 summits, each over 14,000 ft (nearly 100 miles in distance!), in under 60 hours.

Ben shares what this particular group of 14 peaks means to him and how this traverse has shaped the last three years of his life:

In all my life, I have never been so prepared. But in all my life, I have never found the right sequence to complete this unending task, a three year commitment of endurance fitness topping 33 previous years of hard knocks and tussles with progress through the mountains. “Is this time different? Is it worth it?” I have to ask myself — this is the grandest journey on foot of my life — through them and through these years and it has taken longer than I ever thought. It has ground me down while building me up.  It is so long, so enormous.

 

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The last two summers I have “gone for it” 4 times on ultra marathon distance traverses over 10 mountains in central Colorado, on a route known as Nolan’s 14. In that two years I have seen my hopes of finishing crushed more than 75 of 93 miles into it twice.

Despite the setbacks along the way toward reaching an understanding of visiting all 14 of Nolan’s 14’s fourteen thousand foot summits in one push, its mystery and magnetism continue to compel me because I love the mountains and big days.  I have made mistakes out there but had a satisfying and safe time pursuing this adventure and don’t want to give up on my original purpose for engaging with the line in it’s totality. It’s the biggest effort I can reach for these days and I feel like is suited to the most focused strengths I have trained for and within reason.  Now that the time approaches for another long stretch, I’m happy to be exploring it on the best terms I can-those grounded on experience gained on the line and preparation refined each time.

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My plan is to start at the north end of the trail and go in one long push from the Fish Hatchery in Leadville, Co. to the summit of Mount Shavano near Poncha Springs, Co. I’ll have no crew, but will have one pair of shoes, one pack (my Osprey Rev 12) and some pretty sweet food, enough gear to do all 14 of the fourteeners. I’m psyched about this. You might be wondering, how the hell is that possible if it took so much crew before to not finish?  It will, after all, be me alone.

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And this brings me back to the point of this journey, to answer my own questions, to staying committed to a purpose, to answering “is this time different?”  No. This time is the same. I began my journey as a mountaineer in this same mountain range 16 years ago, before a decade committed to high altitude Himalayan exploration. In that time I lived many impressionable memories and shared moments with friends that indemnify a lifetime of happiness.  It is worth it to know the mountains, and also their uncertain moments.  I stopped taking physically consequential risks in the mountains when i became a father 3 years ago. I will always love the mountains and I wanted a safer way to explore them when pushing myself. Nolan’s 14 is for me, that path.

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It is a return to my roots as a climber, I view it as the biggest climb in the world.  It is minimal and asks for a high level of concentration and accountability during the experience. I will need to be present and own the outcome of every decision for days on end…and nights.  I perform my best and truly enjoy the mountains when I have to do that. So many great friends helped me learn it is possible, only in the doing of this would we have known.

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With 4 attempts already under my belt, the first 3 adhering to a set of pre existing conventions that led to 13 others completing sub 60 hour finishes on the line since 1999, and 6 since I first attempted it in 2013, I have learned a thing or two.  Organized more like a competitive event than a mountain traverse, those rules can lead to success if the timing is good.  But with so many opportunities to figure it out in that way specifically and still not completing it due to my own timing and logistical complications, I’ve had to forget those conventions and slowly develop my own personal style based on my experiences on it, what mountaineers would call our “fair means”.  The means is a simpler version of things than what I had been doing or what might normally be done.  Fewer things to line up means better chances, I believe, and still a whole lot of fun.  I hope to flow over it now and to just “surf the chaos” as a good friend would say. I’m excited about the start rather than coordinating a party of people. :)

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Getting the rocks out of my shoe during the 22nd hour of my third 60 hour attempt of Nolan’s 14. Here I am at Elkhead Pass between the summits of Missouri Mt and Mt. Belford-2 of the 14 peaks over 14,000′ on the 93 mile line. Photo: Kendrick Callaway

I will do my best with what knowledge I have to “finish” with as little time on my feet as possible and per the schedule below, which is still below the 60 hour goal I have had previously. This is not implied to be a “solo” journey as there are many people climbing fourteeners every day of the week and being alone out there any time other than night would be rare, it is just an unsupported trip alone and based around the most ideal weather window.  I am heading out there to finish safely, under my own power with all my stuff on me and within a single push.  There are no guarantees, but if history is any indicator and the X factor I have been missing is present then I believe it’ll go!!!!

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“Having fun, now it really starts!” September 1, 2015: Ben summits peak #2, Mt. Elbert

Join us in following Ben’s amazing journey:
Delorme: share.delorme.com/BenjaminClark
Instagram: @bclarkmtn and @ospreypacks

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August 20th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

Stage 3 Recap From the Official Pack Sponsor of USA Pro Challenge

 

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The Climb of Stage 2 from Steamboat Springs to Arapahoe Basin.

“16 world-class teams will compete over seven stages that will take the riders across nearly 600 miles of epic terrain. Included amongst the competitors will be BMC Racing Team, Team Garmin-Sharp and UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling. This year’s race begins in the legendary Bike Town USA, Steamboat Springs, Colorado, and winds across the Rockies to what will certainly be a thrilling circuit finish in the state capital of Denver.”

Stage 3  of the USA Pro Challenge proved to be a challenging one right away with the ascent of Fremont Pass (11,318 feet). That steep climb proved to be just a warm-up as the real challenge for riders was ascending the upper slopes of Independence Pass and then heading down its breathtaking descent into Aspen, where some of the most memorable moments in Pro Challenge history have played out. Over half of Stage 3 of the 2015 USA Pro Cycling Challenge was above 10,000 feet — which makes for incredible views and seriously tired lungs.

  • Check out the final results for Stage 3.
  • Here is a recap video of Stage 3 for those of you who missed it.

 

Onward to Stage 4 in the breathtaking city of Breckenridge, Colorado – which sits at just above 9,000 feet.

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If you are in the area, we would love to see you at the Osprey Packs booth! Here’s just a sampling of what we’ve got going on at our booth for the 2015 Pro Cycle Challenge:

  • Limited Edition FlapJack Pro Cycle Challenge Pack: Osprey is proud to be the Official Pack of the Pro Cycle Challenge! You can pick up one of our newly designed Fall 2015 FlapJack Packs which is co- branded with the Pro Cycle logo,  a functional and memorable souvenir for years to come! In celebration of the Pro Cycle Challenge we doing a killer deal of $85 normally ($110 MSRP) and only while supplies last so don’t delay!FlapJackPack_F15_Side_Black_ProChallenge
  • Osprey Packs Cowbell — all proceeds benefitting IMBA: Earn some good karma points while cheering on the pros by picking up a customized Osprey Packs cowbell! All proceeds from the sale of your ProChallenge cowbell will benefit Osprey Packs’ non-profit partner, International Mountain Bicycling Association, which supports great rides nationwide by providing trail project grants and funding access issues.
  • Pack Fitting by the Experts: In the market for a new pack but still need to figure out some of the details? Not to worry, our Pro Cycle team are pack-fit gurus and can find the pack that fits your specific needs and style! Stop by to get professionally fitted or just to chat about the options we have.
  • 20% off at Mountain Outfitters in Breckenridge: We have teamed up with our local retailer, Mountain Outfitters to bring you 20% off all Osprey Packs in their store! If you are attending the Breckenridge stage of the challenge, stop by to take advantage of this great deal!

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If you weren’t able to make it out to Colorado this year, then check out the livestream of each stage or the Official Tour Tracker to keep up with the racers! Be sure to follow this year’s races on social media with the Official USA Pro Cycle Challenge social sites:

#ProChallenge

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Follow Osprey Packs on social media to keep up with the race throughout the week:

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

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Our friends from Yonder Mountain String Band stopped by to visit!

 

 


August 17th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

Osprey Packs Returns to the USA Pro Cycle Challenge August 17th-23rd

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image provided by colorado.com

“Known for lung-searing altitudes and steep climbs through the Colorado Rockies, the Pro Cycle Challenge is the largest spectator event in the history of the state.”

Osprey Packs will be returning to the Pro Cycle tour to take part in the action-packed week when the largest names in the world of road cycling will compete in some of the most breathtaking stretches of road in Colorado. Of course, the stages in previous years proved to be challenging but 2015 follows this trend with the tour starting in Steamboat Springs before traveling to new host communities Arapahoe Basin and Copper Mountain, as well as an individual time-trail course in Breckenridge.

What else is new for the 2015 Pro Cycle Challenge? This year marks the inaugural Women’s USA Pro Challenge bringing back international level women’s stage racing in Colorado for the first time since the Coors Classic in the 1980s!

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The USA Pro Cycle Challenge is arguably the largest spectator cycling event in the nation and that’s not only because of the race itself. This event provides each host city with an excuse to not only celebrate the racers and sport of cycling, but to put on unique community events such as concerts, family activities, demos, trail running and biking competitions and while spreading the love to fans with a variety of freebies from participating vendors and tour sponsors.

If you plan on following the entire tour or just stopping by for one day, be sure to drop by our booth as we have some great activations and giveaways that you won’t want to miss:

  • Limited Edition FlapJack Pro Cycle Challenge Pack: Combine the best of both worlds – one of our newly designed Fall 2015 FlapJack Packs which is co- branded with the Pro Cycle logo,  a functional and memorable souvenir for years to come! In celebration of the Pro Cycle Challenge we doing a killer deal of $85 normally $110 MSRP) and only while supplies last so don’t delay!FlapJackPack_F15_Side_Black_ProChallenge
  • Osprey Packs Cowbell with all proceeds to IMBA: Earn some good karma points while cheering on the pros by picking up a customized Osprey Packs cowbell! All proceeds will benefit Osprey Packs non-profit partner, International Mountain Bicycling Association, which supports great rides nationwide by providing trail project grants and funding access issues.
  • Pack Fitting by the Experts: In the market for a new pack but still need to figure out some of the details? Not to worry, our Pro Cycle team are pack-fit gurus and can find the pack that fits your specific needs and style! Stop by to get professionally fitted or just to chat about the options we have.
  • 20% off at Mountain Outfitters in Breckenridge: We have teamed up with our local retailer, Mountain Outfitters to bring you 20% off all Osprey Packs in their store! If you are attending the Breckenridge stage of the challenge, stop by to take advantage of this great deal!
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photo via www.colorado.com/Jeremy Swanson

If you weren’t able to make it out to Colorado this year, then check out the livestream of each stage or the Official Tour Tracker to keep up with the racers! Be sure to follow this year’s races on social media with the Official USA Pro Cycle Challenge social sites:

#ProChallenge

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Follow Osprey Packs on social media to keep up with the race throughout the week:

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram


August 12th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

The Lost Mountain: Sourcing the Brain Power of Future Leaders in Conservation

Osprey  - 2 (1)Written by Majka Burhardt – Director of The Lost Mountain and Osprey Athlete

This morning I woke up to a baboon howling outside my safari tent in the middle of Mozambique. As the sun rises over Gorongosa National Park, I set my intentions for the day for me, my five-person team from Additive Adventure, and 35 emerging leaders in the field of disruptive conservation. Disruptive? You bet. It’s disruptive because it’s a new model for building community-driven conservation in some of the world’s most remote and biologically diverse places in the world. Mount Namuli, the site of my now four- year initiative in northern Mozambique called the Lost Mountain, inspired this all.

I believe one of the most fundamental challenges facing our world today is summed up by this one question: can there be powerful collaboration between communities and ecosystems that allow them to both thrive? And to answer this question, we brought the young minds and future leaders of tomorrow into the conversation here at The 2015 Lost Mountain Next Gen Symposium.Osprey  - 3 (1)

Which is what I was explaining recently to Geraldo, my Mozambican counterpart for our ongoing conservation and rural development work on Mount Namuli. “I want their brains,” I said.  Geraldo coughed. We’ve been chatting on Skype for three years and I know by now that his well-timed cough means I need to explain myself better.  “I am not trying to take their brains. I promise. I want to use them…How would you say that in Portuguese?”  It’s the first time we’ve run this Symposium, and it’s been a wild ride.  To me, you can be the best scientist or researcher in the world but without a solid foundation of personal vision, strong leadership skills and a deep respect for the natural environment, all that science and research means nothing. So we’ve taken a multi-disciplinary approach to engaging the next generation.

Since we began just a few days ago, the participants have been thrown into the deep end of leadership training, best practices in conservation and wilderness management, and more. Combining a 5-day intensive in the Open Standards approach to Conservation Management with the first-ever delivery of the Leave No Trace platform in Africa (outside of NOLS trainings in Kenya) and transformative leadership training.  These classroom activities have been punctuated with visits to Gorongosa National Park for a safari, a lab tour of the E.O. Wilson Center for Biodiversity, and for a visit to the Vinho community. Our ultimate goal is that students will draw from all of these disciples and experiences for the final days of planning and creating a plan for Mount Namuli which will then be vetted with Namuli community members and implemented in August.

Put another way, we’re open-sourcing Namuli. And I can’t wait to see what comes of it. Consider what Gerson Timbissa, a Masters candidate in Rural Engineering at Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, wrote when we asked him why he wanted to take part in the Next Gen Symposium: “Humans have produced profound changes in our habitat – much more than any animal species. These changes have often been in one direction that veers away from the natural capacity for regeneration of ecosystems. We have acted in our own interests in short term and have not considered the long term implications…today my spirit is captivated by an even greater enthusiasm for those questions – questions that make me invest time in looking for new perspectives. To me, exploring and conserving nature is like moving a chess piece: the victory depends on the way of thinking.”Gerson is one of 21 African university students who have full scholarships to the Symposium. Meet them and the rest of this crew here.

And that’s enough from me. It’s time to give the next generation the floor.

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Learn more about The 2015 Lost Mountain Next Gen Symposium here: http://www.thelostmountain.org/next-gen-2015-symposium/

Follow the journey:

Facebook: facebook.com/lostmountainorg

Twitter: @majkaburhardt and #LostMountain

Instagram: @majkaburhardt and #LostMountain

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July 26th 2015 - Written by: Joe Stock

Mountaineering in the Arctic Refuge with Osprey Athlete Joe Stock

Osprey Packs Athlete Joe Stock is an internationally certified IFMGA mountain guide based in Anchorage, Alaska. He has been climbing and skiing around the world for 25 years with extensive time in the mountains of Alaska, the Southern Alps of New Zealand, the North Cascades of Washington and Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. Since 1995, Joe has been freelance writing for magazines starting with a feature article in Rock & Ice on climbing the Balfour Face on Mount Tasman in New Zealand. Since then, he’s published numerous articles on adventures and mountain technique in rags such as Climbing, Backcountry, Alaska, Climbing, Trail Runner, Men’s Health and Off Piste.

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In 2009, Paul Muscat and I climbed Mount Chamberlin, then considered to be the highest summit in the Brooks Range at 9,020 feet. Now, Mount Isto might be the highest at 9,060 feet. It was just the excuse we needed for another trip to this pristine wilderness.

Joining us was Glenn Wilson and James Kesterson. Over the past 17 years we’ve been on many trips together: Denali, Mount Baker, Marcus Baker, Mount Bona, Mount Iliamna, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru, Mount Chamberlin, Mount Logan and the Central Talkeetna Mountains. On this trip we didn’t get up Isto, but we had a blast exploring and bagging peaks.

With logistics help from Alaska Alpine Adventures, we flew direct from Fairbanks to the Jago River with Wright Air. It was a two and half hour bush flight, with no in-flight service. This region is better known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, where Alaska’s embarrassing half-term governor once said, “Drill baby drill.”

The plane is a Helio Courier, made in the 1970’s and designed for a low stall speed. Supposedly it will fall horizontally rather than nose dive. The tires are Alaskan Bushwheels, made near Anchorage in Chugiak. They are the “premier tire for extreme backcountry adventures.”


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Glenn and I got brand new Volt 75 packs for the trip. They were perfect! The right size for our eight days of food, fuel and mountaineering gear. They fit like a slipper, straight out of the wrapper. Once again, Osprey made our trip better.

 

mtn.anwr.stock-720Our first summit was the 8,625-foot Screepik. While conducting summit LNC (Leave No Cairn) we found Tom Choate’s name in a sodden film canister. In 1999 he climbed Screepik and made the impressive scramble over to Isto. His trip reports are in the October 1999, February 2000 and the November 2013 Scree newsletters from the Mountaineering Club of Alaska. Choate called Peak 8625 “Spectre”. First ascentionists called it Shadow Peak. Keeping with the tradition, we called it Screepik. Scree for the endless boulderfields, and “pik” for the Inuit word for “genuine.”

 

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Descending from the summit of Screepik. Nobody out there. Just us.

 

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After eight days of mountaineering at high camp, we returned to a base camp by the landing strip on the Jago River. Here’s Paul on one of our day-hikes from camp. Our tent is a tundra-colored dot in the tundra fields way down there along the river.

 

mtn.anwr.stock-790Another day hike along the Jago, this time up the big split in the river. While the first part of our trip was cold, drizzly and snowy, the second part was warm, calm and sunny. The bugs weren’t even out yet. Conditions were ideal for snoozing in the soft tundra.

 

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James, Paul and Glenn mid-layover at the Arctic Village Airport terminal on the flight home. Thanks for another great trip guys! And all the memories. I can’t wait until the next installment. Maybe to try Isto again. Maybe to try the next highest Brooks Range summit. There is a rumor that it’s now some unnamed peak. Oh bummer. I guess we have to go back…. 



July 20th 2015 - Written by: alison

Why Wheelies Rule (and how to land one…) with Osprey Athlete Alison Gannett

Wheelies Rule. Period.

Is it the coolness/radness factor? For sure.

Fun and thrilling? Yep.

Are they a trophy to add to your collection of tricks? Yes!
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Many folks dream of doing a wheelie and they are surprisingly easier than you might think.

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July 11th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

10 Questions with Osprey Athlete Joe Schwartz

10 Questions with Osprey Athlete Joe Schwartz

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1. What place inspires you? Why does it inspire you?

The mountains. They’re a source of endless inspiration, respect and learning. They’re where I’ve spent some of the best times of my life with the people that matter, and I look forward to many more years exploring in the hills.

Osprey Packs Athlete Joe Schwartz mountain

2. What one item do you always have in your pack?

Leatherman multitool.

3. Who do you most admire?

Anybody who is driven, passionate, and carving out their own path in life.

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4. What is your favorite food?

Tacos.

5. Which Osprey pack are you using right now? What is your favorite feature about your pack?

I ski with the Kode 32, which is the most thought out and convenient ski pack I’ve ever used. I mountain bike with the Zealot 15, a very well-designed pack perfect for all rides, from backyard epics to full-on days of enduro racing.

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6. Do you have a favorite quote? What is it?

“Go confidently in the direction of your dreams.  Live the life you have imagined.” –Henry David Thoreau

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7. What’s the number one place you’d love to visit next?

Japan. Either for the plentiful powder, great cuisine, nice people, or the rumoured epic singletrack.

8. What is your favorite nonprofit organization?

Doctors Without Borders

9. Is there an adventure, trip, or journey you’ve taken that you’d say was “life changing?” What was it and how did it change your life or outlook?

Probably a mountain bike trip I did to Bolivia several years ago. It was an amazing trip from a bike perspective: we rode unreal trails in beautiful settings. I was most affected by the locals though: so much poverty in this country, and such hard living circumstances, yet so many happy people.

10. If you could give any advice to yourself at 10 years old, what would you say?

“Keep doing what you’re doing! Make sure to spend time with those that matter. And don’t fall on your head so much.”

 Osprey Packs Athlete Joe Schwartz ski

About Joe Schwartz:

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What I do keeps me young, it keeps me engaged and happy. I really truly find myself in the mountains, and I know it’s a place that will always remain special to me. I’m a connoisseur of good times.

Follow Joe’s adventures:

joeschwartz.ca

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

YouTube

 


July 2nd 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

Norway Skibuskineering

 

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Known as the birthplace of skiing, Norway has probably been the subject of most backcountry skiers’ dreams. It has always been on my radar after watching the Norwegians dominate the Olympic Cross Country Ski events over the years, not to mention the stories of endless daylight and sweet terrain.

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There’s only one problem Norway creates for  skiers…it just happens to be one of the most expensive places in the world to visit. Be warned my fellow skiers: Norway is the 5th richest country in world, as is visible in the sculpture-laden streets of all the towns we visited. Here are some examples of what things cost in Norway as opposed to Canada:

  • Laguna Burger, no fries: $30 CAD. California patio with beach views not included.
  • Corona beer: $25
  • Gasoline, per/litre: $2.25
  • Last minute car rental: $199 per day

Having a lifetime of practice in ski bohemia, I knew we could stretch a budget. But Norway’s prices and our lack of preparation before this trip made for quite an uphill battle. Luckily we don’t mind ‘earning’ our turns, and our Norwegian Ski-Bus-Skineering mission began.

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We started in Oslo, but the classic fjord skiing was waaaaay up in the Lyngen Alps in the North. Following a quick Facebook check, I noticed that our friend Adam U. was in Norway and he diverted us to the much closer Jotunheimen zone and we hopped on the first bus out. This was all good in concept, but after we fell asleep the bus kept on driving right past our desired mountain pass in the night. Good thing camping is allowed anywhere in Norway, so we camped on the grass in Årdalstangen, a quaint little town that reminded me of  Terrace, BC.

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In Ski-Bus-Skineering if you don’t plan efficiently you can lose use huge amounts of time, forcing you to spend down time at bus stations (which tend harbour some sketchy characters). Eventually, we did reach snow.

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Once on snow and skinning uphill it felt good to be in our natural environment. The variable weather felt like a familiar mellow BC coastal ski tour. Of course in any new area it’s always good to respect the weather — I was feeling confident we’d get up to the peak when BOOM — whiteout, and the classic “stay-or-go” debate began. Fortunately it did clear after 5 minutes and we tagged Turboka peak.

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The weather tease proved to be a good warning sign for later in the trip — the next day was a full storm-raining through the tent, indicating that it was time to move on.
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Since we were in Scandinavia with funky weather, the trip wouldn’t be complete without a detour to Sweden, then a short stop to the bustling bike city of Copenhagen, Denmark — the #1 bike friendly country in the world! We stretched out the legs and took those rental bikes for a rip.
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Riding bikes in Copenhagen was such a cool experience and a definite highlight of the trip. Everyone rides bikes in Denmark, whether they’re a 4 year-old or 80 your-old…or the whole family. North America could really learn a thing or two, especially people who live in cities. The amazing benefits of bikes — they’re cheap, a healthy alternative to driving, good for the environment and you always feel better after your ride your bike.
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With more Ski-Bus-Skineering calling, we jumped back to Oslo and then to the other side of the Jotunheimen park, home of Galdhøpiggen, the highest peak in Norway.

24 hours to left to burn meant GO: Oslo to Lom by bus, hitchhiking with a German plumber to Spiterstulen, set up camp. At 7:30pm, climb…then turn around 500 feet from the summit thanks to another whiteout.

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Bag some birthday turns off Norway’s ‘almost’ high mark, hitchhike ride from Norwegian carpenter, 40 minutes later bus to Lom, and 20 minutes later bus to Oslo. A dialed skibuskineering connection. #journeyisthereward.
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Our first trip to Norway was a rewarding tease and we’ll have to come back. The Northern meccas of the Lyngen Alps and Svalbard are there waiting for us, as long as we stick enough Kroners in our pockets. Until then, local missions to BC’s Waddington Range sound right up our alley: Cheap, big terrain, and guaranteed adventure. Onto the next adventure…
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Story: Andy Traslin
Follow Andy’s adventures:
Follow Mike Traslin, Andy’s brother and fellow Osprey Athlete:
About Osprey Athlete Andy Traslin

“I like to push myself to the maximum in the mountains to see what I can do physically to my abilities. My parents got me into skiing and the mountains at a young age. I progressed to ski racing, to front country, then I started finding powder stashes I had to keep going further and further to see what was around the next corner.

In addition to having worked eight years as a ski patroller, I have been racing in the pro/elite category for several seasons as a mountain biker. Racing enables me to go further and faster in the mountains in pursuit of steep skiing and speed traverses.  Other activities I like: free ride mountain biking, road riding, bouldering, rock climbing, mountaineering, ice hockey, tennis, trailrunning . I like to go see live bands in small venues. I’ve been following the Vancouver Canucks for many years in their quest for the Stanley Cup.”


June 14th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

10 Questions with Osprey Athlete Sven Brunso

10 Questions with Osprey Athlete Sven Brunso

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1. What place inspires you?

The Alps are the place that brings me inspiration. The magnitude of the mountains, nearly limitless access, the ski culture and food make for an unbeatable experience. Every time I visit the Alps I fall in love with skiing all over again.

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2. What one item do you always have in your pack?

Hot Egyptian Licorice Tea in a thermal bottle. Nothing is better than some hot tea in the mountains. Sipping some sweet and spicy tea soaking while up the mountains is a pretty incredible combo.

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3. Who do you most admire?

Early mountaineers that made historic ascents with rudimentary gear. The early mountaineers were extremist as they did amazing things with little fanfare or potential reward.

4. What is your favorite food?

Kaiserschmarrn. An Austrian dessert made with pancakes, rum, raisins, powdered sugar and plum sauce. It’s so good that sometimes I will eat it twice a day while skiing in Austria.

5. Which Osprey pack are you using right now? What is your favorite feature about your pack?

I love the Kode series. On really big days in the backcountry I use the Kode 42 ABS pack. I can take a puffy, extra gloves, a big bottle of tea, all my avalanche gear and my skins. On regular days I will take the Kode 22 as it has plenty of room for everything I need and it feels like I am skiing without a pack. I love that both the Kode 22 and 42 have a great spot to stow my helmet on top of the pack.

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June 7th 2015 - Written by: Kelsy

10 Questions with Osprey Athlete Ben Rueck

10 Questions with Osprey Athlete Ben Rueck

Ben Rueck on Gutless Wonder -- 5.14b, Fault Wall, Puoux -- Glenwood Springs, CO

Ben Rueck on Gutless Wonder — 5.14b, Fault Wall, Puoux — Glenwood Springs, CO | photo by Dan Holz

 

1. What place inspires you?

The place that inspires me the most is Africa.  It is the one continent that offers the most diversity in culture and climbing.  Guaranteed if I travel to Africa I am going experience a life changing event.

2. What one item do you always have in your pack?

 Climbing shoes

3. Who do you most admire?

This is a complicated question for me. I think that I admire a person that pursues their full potential– no matter how scared they are. To expand outside your comfort zone is something that is difficult and takes commitment. If I had to narrow it to a person that would be negating many influential people in my life that live this kind of way. So I admire those who try.

Ben Rueck on Gutless Wonder -- 5.14b, Fault Wall, Puoux -- Glenwood Springs, CO

Ben Rueck on Gutless Wonder — 5.14b, Fault Wall, Puoux — Glenwood Springs, CO | photo by Dan Holz

4. What is your favorite food?

Mom’s homemade tacos.

5. Which Osprey pack are you using right now? What is your favorite feature about your pack?

Right now I am using the Variant.  My favorite feature about the pack is that it can handle all of my climbing gear and still feel comfortable on long approaches.

6. Do you have a favorite quote? What is it? (more…)


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