June 5th 2012 - Written by: Kelsy

Travel Tuesday: Skiing down the 14th Highest Peak in the World


In the fall just over two years ago, a team of four traveled to Tibet with the goal of making a first ski descent off of the 14th highest peak in the world, the 26,289-foot (8,013-meter) Mount Shishapangma.

The video of this experience (above) is beautiful in and of itself. The scenery — from the streets of Kathmandu to the slopes of Shishapangma — is striking, unique and utterly unlike the hustle and bustle of any city in the U.S. What can’t be seen in the film are the other sensory experiences of the adventure, from sounds to smells to tastes and touch.

As one of the four teammates, Kim Havell, wrote via her post on Nat Geo of what can’t be fully visualized in the video, Kathmandu was something like this:

“At the threshold of this exotic world, we were greeted with an overwhelming display of noises, smells, dust, two-stroke smoke, and an overpowering visual of used plastics strewn throughout its narrow and congested streets. However, once the introductory veil was lifted, the chaos became an organized frenzy. The winding passages had their own symmetry and the overabundance of visual stimuli dissolved into a more rational perspective. The plastic and waste was in part due to Western impact. And, at that time, neither Nepal nor Tibet had solid infrastructure in place for garbage disposal.”

The short film above takes you from this city with overwhelming energy into a pure white mountain landscaped with a sense of calm and peace at its core, creating a juxtaposition that makes the film intriguing at its very core. Enjoy!

Whether you’re a weekend warrior or an insatiable globetrotter, we understand your thirst for adventure. That’s why every Tuesday, we scour the internet to find the perfect story, photo or video to stoke your wanderlust. Need a rugged traveling companion? Check out our travel series to find the perfect fit!

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Whether your pack was purchased in 1974 or yesterday, Osprey will repair any damage or defect for any reason free of charge.